TALKING “THE AGE OF INNOCENCE” WITH STAR SIERRA BOGGESS

SIERRA BOGGESS IS SINGING A NEW TUNE.

After catapulting to Broadway fame in 2007 as the titular character in The Little Mermaid, Boggess has spent the past decade cementing herself as a contemporary musical theater icon. Having originated roles in shows like Love Never DiesIt Shoulda Been You, and School of Rock, as well as appearing in Les MisérablesThe Secret Garden and several incarnations of The Phantom of the Opera, the soprano has become one of the most sought after vocalists of her generation. Even her role in Master Class had her singing throughout most of that production, despite the fact that the show was not a musical.

But just like Ariel, Boggess is now navigating a new challenge – not using her singing voice. In The Age of Innocence, adapted from the classic novel by Edith Wharton, she is showing off her acting range by performing in a straight play. As the free-spirited Countess Ellen Olenska, Boggess is playing a woman who has fled her unhappy marriage in Europe and returned home to New York in 1870. What ensues is a scandalous love triangle that explores class, the morals of society, and the power of human attraction.

I spoke with Boggess about working on The Age of Innocence, her passion for animal activism, returning to Broadway, her solo music, and much more.

ALEX NAGORSKI: Growing up, who or what were some of your biggest influences that made you want to pursue a career in theater?

SIERRA BOGGESS: Barbra Streisand! I have to always start with Barbra Streisand. She was my first role model in the theater. After I saw the film version of Hello Dolly, she continued to be a huge inspiration in my life forever. Julie Andrews made me want to do this as well.

As I grew up, on the spiritual side, I was influenced by people like Wayne Dyer, Marianne Williamson and Brené Brown – people who have helped me think about life. That sort of thinking helps me as an artist even more, instead of just in my small artist circle, if that makes sense.

You tend to perform in musicals over straight plays. Why did The Age of Innocence seem like the perfect fit for your latest theatrical endeavor?

When the project came up, I read the play and was immediately in love with it. I had never read the novel or seen the film before, but I understood the character of Ellen right away. I was really, really excited to try and sink my teeth into it!

The other thing was that the director of this production is Doug Hughes. I had just seen Junk at Lincoln Center, which he directed, and I was like, “Who directed this? This is so incredible!” All of a sudden, I saw that he was directing The Age of Innocence and I wanted to work with him so badly.

Douglas McGrath is the playwright for this – he adapted it for the stage. He is also extraordinary. It was just a whole experience of “I want to work with these people!” and I really wanted to play this part. Luckily, they cast me, so I feel happy!

Countess Ellen Olenska is often regarded as a fierce and independent woman who was far ahead of her time. As an actor, how do you think this character differs from your previous stage roles? What have been some highlights of bringing her to life?

Well, one thing is that she doesn’t sing everything, so that’s a major difference! I try to find myself and tell my truth in whatever character I’m playing. I haven’t even been thinking about how she is different because I think a lot of the characters I’ve played are actually quite fierce in their own ways.

What I love about bringing Ellen to life is that she is trying her best. She’s not coming into this world trying to be difficult. She’s just doing the best that she can with the tools that she’s been given, and that’s not good enough for the people that believe in New York society in 1870. She’s just bringing herself to the table and always trying to be accepted by being truthful and by being herself.

I think one of the most heartbreaking lines that she says is, “Does no one here want to know the truth?” That’s what’s been fascinating to play because it’s incredibly vulnerable. She’s a woman in this time, she is alone, she is thinking things that other people don’t think and doing things that other people don’t do. It’s not to be like, “Look at me, I dare to be different!” It’s more that she’s just trying to be her most honest and authentic self. I love that about her.

How much are you relying on the novel to find your interpretation of Ellen? Will this production explore your character in ways beyond what is known of her from the source material?

It does! Edith Wharton wrote so beautifully, but Doug McGrath has really smartly added some things into the play so that you are never confused about what someone is thinking or feeling. He pays such homage to her work and I think the viewers are going to be thrilled. It feels almost seamless. For example, you see how the love between my character and Newland happens – how almost accidental it is just because they’re being their authentic selves.

I was relying on the novel before I started rehearsal, just to help myself with research. What was great about that is Edith Wharton describes 1870 very vividly, so you know exactly what’s going on and what is expected of a person in society. That was very helpful. It’s been really interesting to do research about that time, especially since I’ve lived in New York for 15 years. Researching what New York was like then has just been so cool.

Edith Wharton became the first woman to ever receive the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction when she won for The Age of Innocence in 1921. Prior to signing onto this show, were you a fan of hers? What do you think it is about her work that has made it so timeless and such a staple of American literature?

Isn’t that so cool? I think it’s the honesty of how she speaks about that time that she was living in. In a way, it makes you feel sorry for her, because she was just so aware– if that makes sense.

I think she maybe feels herself in Ellen a little bit – where she can see that something doesn’t feel right and is wondering why no one is talking about what’s actually going on. There’s a great line that she wrote that’s also in our play, and it’s something like, “Knowing things makes people think that you don’t have to talk about what’s going on.” It’s basically saying that if we know something is happening, we don’t have to talk about it. But that actually creates loneliness!

To me, that’s what makes her so interesting. She’s commenting on her own society at the time when she’s living in it. Plus, the way she describes things and her use of language is just stunning. I mean, it’s got to be that.

Although it’s set during the Gilded Age, The Age of Innocence is still very relevant to contemporary audiences. Is there a primary takeaway that you hope audiences leave with after seeing this show?

Doug Hughes talked to us a bit about this when we started. He’s calling this sort of a memory play. It’s Newland’s memory of what this time was. I think that’s why it’s relevant, because people still have these types of pulls today. It’s called The Age of Innocence, but it’s almost like it’s about integrity. It forces us to ask if we are choosing things based on being right or on being kind? Do we do things based on our integrity, based on what our gut is telling us to do, or are we just freely doing what we want because it feels good for us? The play really makes us ask and wrestle with those questions. I hope people walk away thinking about that.

What I keep coming back to is the underlying river of integrity, and how deep and passionate love makes us feel invincible – but also crazy and psycho. If we can ground it in integrity, then we can sort of get our answers of what we’re supposed to do. I feel like I’ll become a better person just having done this play.

Do you have plans to remain involved with this play beyond its world premiere in Hartford? Are there plans for future regional productions and/or to bring it to Broadway?

Yes, there are! I don’t know what I’m allowed to say, but yes, there is definitely one other production happening that we know of.

On your website, you describe yourself as “an avid yogi, vegetarian, and animal rights activist.” What are some ways that you encourage people to help with animal rights activism and what is it about this cause that makes it so important to you?

I think that we’re their voices. There is nothing better on this planet than animals. They are all beings of love. I’ve even brought my cats with me to Hartford! Actually, a lot of the actors and people involved with the play also brought their cats and dogs. I think that’s so important! As actors, a lot of us have animals. They are always there to remind you that the present moment is all there is.

There’s nothing that breaks my heart more than people who abuse animals. All this stuff goes on, like trophy hunting. I love the Humane Society and think that they’re really great. They tend to always talk about the good things that they’re doing, as opposed to always inundating us with “look how bad people are abusing” or whatever. That positivity is very important to me.

Bernadette Peters on Broadway has come up with Broadway Barks. I love that somuch – being able to raise money, help animals, and promote an “adopt don’t shop” message, and stuff like that.

I hope to eventually have a platform big enough that I can make real changes for these amazing creatures that we have. I really believe that as humans, we’re supposed to take care of and protect them.

You created your “I Am Enough!” initiative as a way to engage with and help your fans/followers embrace their full potentials. Can you please elaborate a bit about what this initiative consists of and what your goals for it are?

When I was doing The Little Mermaid, I was getting a lot of mail from people. This was the start of fan mail for me, 10 years ago. It was funny because it wasn’t just, “Hey, I love you, can I get an autograph?” It was, “Here’s my life story.” People talked to me about all sorts of stuff – some were suicidal, some were dealing with self-harm, eating disorders, all kinds of stuff.

I realized people were writing to me because I was representing Ariel, a character who believes they were born in the wrong body or the wrong time. That realization was very deep for me. I think people often didn’t even realize that’s what they were connecting with. The same can be said about my Phantom of the Opera character, Christine Daaé. People were relating to this girl who is representing someone who loves the unlovable.

What I realized is I can’t write everyone back and fix everything that they were talking about. But what I cando is write simply, “You are enough! It’s unbelievable how enough you are.” To me, the idea that we are put on this planet is enough. It’s what we do with that trusting of our enough-ness that makes us go on many different journeys. I encourage everyone to start from the place of “I am enough! And now I can answer my questions of what I should do or who I am.”

As I was writing back, “Hey, whatever your name is, you are enough. Love, Sierra,” that in itself was enough. Now, it’s turned into this huge movement! I feel like it’s my responsibility to keep reminding people, as much as they need to, that we can start from that place. I think that will help us with a lot of different self-harm or disorders or things like that. It doesn’t necessarily fix anything, and those thoughts will often come because at the end of the day, we are human and self-doubt is there. But if I can help remind people of that, then that, to me, is good.

What’s amazing is when I’ve toured, even in places like Australia and Japan, I will start to say “You are enough!” and people in the audience will start saying it with me. I think it’s just incredible to see that message have that kind of reach all over the world. I love being associated with that as much as I love being associated with characters that I’ve played.

Last spring, I interviewed your friend and frequent collaborator, Ramin Karimloo. He mentioned that part of why he loves working with you is that the two of you have a shorthand and a real trust with one another. He said that in particular, working on The Secret Garden at Lincoln Center with you was a real highlight. From your perspective, what do you think it is that makes you such a captivating pair on stage? And what’s been your favorite collaboration with him so far?

It’s exactly what he said. We do have a shorthand and we do trust each other. We know how each other works, we know the things we each struggle with and the things we’re really good at. But at the core of it is trust. The first time that we met, there was an instant onstage chemistry within just minutes of meeting each other. That is very unique, I think. There was also something where we just got each other right away. That meeting was to do Love Never Dies in London, so I will always love and be sentimental about that, since it was our first collaboration.

Another favorite was the 25th anniversary of Phantom at Royal Albert Hall. I feel like we almost left our artistic souls on that stage with each other for a while. I felt like I was hungover after that experience. I wassofulfilled doing that with him. We just really trusted each other for that show. I’m glad that it was filmed because if ever in my life, I want to reflect on that time, then I will be able to. That was a very special night for us. It’s so cool that it was preserved.

Speaking of The Secret Gardenit’s been confirmed that Warren Carlyle will be directing and choreographing the first Broadway revival of the show later this year. Do you plan to be a part of that production in any way? If not, what type of show and/or role would you like to tackle next on the Great White Way? 

Well, I would love for The Age of Innocence to come to Broadway. I think that this is a play that people are ready for, especially in this time that we’re in. I really, really hope that we do get a chance to do this on Broadway. It would be nice to do another play on Broadway. The last time I did a play was Master Class, but that almost doesn’t feel like a play because I sang so much in it!

With The Secret Garden, I love that show. I make no secret about that. It’s one of my favorite scores. The revival will be a different production and different team than the one Ramin and I did at Lincoln Center, so I don’t know. I would be thrilled to be involved in that production, but regardless, I’m going to be thrilled because that score will get to be revived!

This year, there are multitudes of celebrations of Andrew Lloyd Webber – including (but not limited to) the release of his memoir and new retrospective album to the debut of a new musical revue to television specials and more. Having appeared in multiple iterations of The Phantom of the Opera and originating roles in both Love Never Dies and School of Rock, you’re often referred to as a muse of the iconic composer. What is it about your work together that keeps drawing you back to one another? And how are you planning to celebrate his landmark 70th birthday?

Well, I’m doing this play at the time of his actual birthday, but I will definitely be celebrating!

About us working together, I just love the way that he writes. I mean we alldo! His music is accessible to all of us. There’s also something about the Phantom score that I just never feel done with. He’s very special and I feel really lucky to have the relationship I have with him.

I’m thrilled that this year is celebrating so many aspects of his life. As long as I’m available to celebrate him, then I will be there. If I’m unavailable, I’ll still be celebrating. I’ll always just celebrate him!

And what a cool year for him! There are also the Alan Jay Lerner and Leonard Bernstein centennials, so there are a lot of big things happening this year.

In 2013, you released your debut solo album, Awakening: Live at 54 Below. Do you have any plans for a follow-up solo record?

I do, yes! I’m always talking with a friend of mine, who wants to produce it. It’s just figuring out the timing, but I definitely want to make another album. We’re always talking about it, and just trying to find the time.

As a child, you played the flute and were a competitive figure skater. If you weren’t a theater performer today, would you still be pursuing one of these passions or would you be doing something else?

I really did want to go to the Olympics. For a long time, I couldn’t even watch the ice skating portion of the Olympics because it was just too painful. It hurt so badly. But skating was such an expensive sport that we just couldn’t afford it anymore. I remember that being a huge heartbreak for me when I was younger, but yes, figure skating is what I would have definitely still pursued.

Springtime often sees the debuts of numerous new shows on Broadway and this year is no exception. Purely from the standpoint of a fan, what new show(s) are you most looking forward to seeing over the next few months?

Oh, well I’ve got to go see Carousel! That’s not a new show, but I have to see the new revival. My friend Lindsay Mendez is playing Carrie Pipperidge. I’m also really excited about Frozen!

Another show that opened this season that I really love is The Band’s Visit. It’s so powerful and I just loved it. It’s incredible! The woman who’s the lead in it, Katrina Lenk, is so amazing. Everybody in that show is. It’s so different than anything that I’ve seen, so I loved that. I recommend that show for all people.

What are some dream roles on your musical theater bucket list that you’d love to play?

It’s funny because with whatever role that comes up, I’m like, “Oh, that’s my dream! I didn’t know this was my dream!”

I think I want to do some revivals now, because that’s the stuff that I love and that made me want to do theater. I would really love to do Sweet Charity. I would actually also love to do Camelot, because I love that score so much. That score is just really incredible and I think that maybe people forget that. It’s due for a revival. But I’m up for whatever!

Thanks so much, Sierra! Is there anything else that you would like to talk about that we didn’t discuss?

I have to say that The Age of Innocence is really beautifully done. I can’t say enough about our director, Doug Hughes. I can’t think of anyone better to direct this piece. He is an absolute dream come true. He’s everything that I had heard about him and had dreamed about working with. What he’s done with this piece is really incredible.

And I also want to say how incredible the cast that I’m working with is. We just finished our first week of rehearsals, and are beginning to put it on stage here in Connecticut. We did a week of rehearsals last week in New York, and this is now the end of our second week. It’s one of those casts where we are all so lucky that we’re getting to work with each other. I’m really thrilled about that. They’re all such incredible actors, and specifically incredible play actors. They’re such a great team of people. I feel really honored to be among them.


 

CLICK HERE to purchase tickets for The Age of Innocence, playing at Hartford Stage in Connecticut from April 5 through May 6.


Originally published on PopBytes

TALKING “CRUEL INTENTIONS: THE MUSICAL” WITH STAR LAUREN ZAKRIN

Cruel Intentions: The ’90s Musical Experience

Lauren ZakrinLAUREN ZAKRIN IS READY TO SHOW YOU HER DARK SIDE.

Fresh off playing the titular character’s understudy in Broadway’s Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812, the Michigan-raised actress’ newest project is taking her deep into a corrupt world of secrets, seduction, and deception. As the dangerous and manipulative Kathryn Merteuil in Cruel Intentions: The Musical, Zakrin is transforming from an ingénue to a villain.

After two sold out runs in Los Angeles, Cruel Intentions: The Musical has arrived in New York City for a limited engagement (through February 19, 2018). Opening December 11th, the show is based on the 1999 cult-classic motion picture of the same name. Created by Jordan RossLindsey Rosin and the film’s director, Roger Kumble, this stage adaptation features a compilation of throwback hits, including some of the best-known tracks from the movie’s legendary soundtrack – including Counting Crows’ “Colorblind” and The Verve’s “Bittersweet Symphony.”

I spoke with Zakrin about getting to be a “bad guy” for the first time, her connection to the show’s source material, performing some of the biggest songs of the ‘90s, her musical theater dream roles, and more.

Cruel Intentions: The Musical

ALEX NAGORSKI: Growing up, were you a fan of the movie? What’s your first or favorite memory about the effect it had on you?

LAUREN ZAKRIN: I was absolutely a fan! And I hate to admit it, but I was on Team Kathryn. I don’t know what it says about me as a person, but the darkness and the power of her character fascinated me. I think I might have been a little young for it, so the movie felt like this dirty little secret that I hadn’t quite figured out yet.

Cruel Intentions: The MusicalAside from the movie itself, where/who else are you drawing inspiration from to shape your interpretation of Kathryn?

I think it would be easy to point the finger and say that I am drawing inspiration from girls who were unkind to me in high school, and of course I do. But it’s much more juicy to find the Kathryn that already lives within me. Even if she has never come out before, I think we all have a little Kathryn Merteuil inside, whether or not we would like to admit it.

Have you had an opportunity to meet and/or speak with Sarah Michelle Gellar (who played Kathryn in the film) about this role?

Unfortunately, I have not met Queen SMG. However, I have heard that she attended the show while it was running in LA! Everyone says she was lovely, and very supportive. If I do get to meet her, my inner Buffy-obsessed pre-teen self will probably freak out.

Kathryn and her stepbrother Sebastian have – to put it mildly – quite an unconventional relationship. How have you and your co-star Constantine Rousouli found the balance between passion and revenge that these two characters force one another to endure?

Cruel Intentions: The MusicalConstantine and I were fortunate enough to walk into the process already knowing each other. Nine years ago, we toured together in Legally Blonde, my very first job! It has been helpful to have a bit of history and trust in the bag when diving into a relationship as complicated as Kathryn and Sebastian’s. Everything else between our characters just seems to be falling into place. There is a natural flirtation and playfulness between us. We know how to poke fun at each other. And we also know when the other one needs support. Constantine has also already been on the Cruel Intentions ride for a couple of years now, and it’s been wonderful to have him holding my hand and guiding me through the world! It doesn’t hurt that he is devilishly handsome, either.

As an actor, how does getting to play a villain differ from some of your previous characters in musicals such as Wicked and Grease?

Kathryn is my very first villain, my first “mean girl.”  In the beginning, I was intimidated by her darkness, but now … I LOVE IT. I find it very therapeutic to expose all of the facets of her to an audience.

The film was based on the novel Dangerous Liaisons (which was also turned into a movie). What do you think it is about this story that has allowed it to live on in so many incarnations and mediums?

Everyone is capable of darkness. I think telling a story that exposes the ugliness of human nature, the selfishness, the jealously, the desire and the cruelty not only forces us to address the unkindnesses in the world around us and why they are happening, but to also acknowledge our own thoughts and actions. It forces us to address our own capabilities towards good and evil. Everyone has dirty little secrets and fantasies, and perhaps everyone has done a thing or two that they aren’t proud of … but pretending otherwise isn’t helpful, nor is slapping a quick label on it. We must address it and examine it, and find the why. I think these stories allow us to take the look that we might be too afraid to do on our own.

The musical is filled with some of the biggest hits of the 90’s – including songs by artists like Britney Spears, No Doubt, R.E.M., Christina Aguilera and Jewel. As a performer, how do you go about re-contextualizing these iconic songs within a musical theater narrative?

As a performer, you must strive to make each song as story driven as possible. Of course, when these songs drop in the show, the audience loves it. There is a lot of laughter and hooting and singing along, which is exactly how it should be. But as the storytellers, we have to try to resist falling into the trap of the joke. The song’s nostalgia is the joke, but the performance of it is not. That’s the only way to maintain the integrity of the story itself, while weaving in these fun 90’s hits.

The show takes place at renowned downtown Manhattan venue (le) Poisson Rouge, complete with bar and table service. How does performing in this type of nightlife environment contrast from being on stage in a more traditional theater?

Cruel Intentions: The MusicalAfter doing The Great Comet of 1812 in a tent in the Meatpacking District, I have found that I really thrive in a more interactive environment. I think we have this wonderful opportunity to push the boundaries and change the shape of how theater can be done or seen. Cruel Intentions is meant to be a dirty, wicked little party, so it fits perfectly into Le Poisson Rouge’s rock-and-roll world. It’s the perfect place to have a drink in your hand and be singing along to Ace of Base.

You made your Broadway debut in 2014 as Sherrie in Rock of Ages, a musical about the 1980s. Now that Cruel Intentions has taken you to the following decade, do you have more fun reliving and exploring the ‘80s or ‘90s through your work? 

was a child of the 90s, so revisiting them still brings me a little bit of shame when I have to look at some of my fashion and music choices. Doing something like Rock of Ages really let me feel like I was diving into another world that I got to learn about and explore.

You’ve been very vocal on social media about the absurdity, cruelty and chaos that defines our current presidential administration. Is it your hope that stepping into the nostalgia-tinged 90’s world of this immersive musical experience will provide audience members with a temporary pass for true escapism? Or are there larger lessons/takeaways that you’re hoping the audience leaves with?

I think we absolutely have an opportunity to comment on the current climate, and to point at things that may or may not have changed socially and politically. There are moments for escapism, but it is always a shame when the opportunity is missed to create change.  As I mentioned, I hope this story, at the very least, allows people to honestly observe, address, and examine the unkindnesses and cruelties within them and in the world around them.

I was fortunate enough to catch your phenomenal turn as Natasha in Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812 this past summer opposite Oak Onaodowan and Ingrid Michaelson. What were your thoughts/feelings on the show’s abrupt and controversial closing?

Thank you for your kind words! All I can say is that Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812 has been the most rewarding and beautiful experience of my professional life, and I miss it every day!

In addition to Cruel Intentions, you’ve been a part of several other movie-to-musical adaptations – including Legally BlondeCatch Me If You Can, and Flashdance. In your experience, what are both the most rewarding and challenging aspects of bringing such beloved films to life on stage?

It is always helpful to begin a project that already has a built-in fan base. However, there can be some challenges in navigating how to maintain the things that people love about the movie while keeping the stage adaptation fresh and relevant. While we want to stay true to all of the iconic moments people are dying to see, it is important to know when change is necessary to best tell the story today. It is also important to avoid the trap of replicating or imitating a performance. The characters need to remain truthful in our bodies, and our interpretations of them grounded in honesty.

What is your musical theater dream role?

Natasha in The Great Comet of 1812. Christine in Phantom of the Opera. Clara in The Light in the Piazza. Marilyn Monroe. Or better yet, something new and all my own!

CLICK HERE to purchase tickets for Cruel Intentions: The Musical, playing now through February 19, 2018 at (le) Poisson Rouge in New York City.

Originally published on PopBytes

TALKING ‘ANASTASIA’ AND MORE WITH RAMIN KARIMLOO!

RAMIN KARIMLOO IS WITHOUT A DOUBT THE BEST MALE SINGER ON BROADWAY.

The 38-year-old actor has an incomparable talent that has made anything he does the “must-see” musical event of whatever season it falls in. After attending a production of The Phantom of the Opera when he was 12, Karimloo discovered his passion for musical theater. In 2007, his journey came full circle when he played The Phantom in the iconic show’s West End production. He then went on to be hand-picked by Andrew Lloyd Webber to originate the role of The Phantom in Love Never Dies, the composer’s sequel to his original classic.

Amongst his illustrious stage credits, Karimloo is best known for his Tony-nominated starring turn in the 2014 revival of Les Miserables. His unprecedented, gritty, and raw take on his character became instantly unforgettable as he redefined and reinvented who Jean Valjean was.

Now, fresh off his West End run in the U.K. premiere of Murder Ballad, Karimloo has returned to Broadway. Starring as Gleb in Anastasia, the actor is going from playing a hero to a villain. I spoke with him about this latest venture, his solo music, being an Iranian-born actor in the age of Trump, and much more.

ALEX NAGORSKI: You have two children, Hadley and Jaiden. Are they fans of the movie Anastasia? If so, how much “cool cred” did doing this show give you at home?

RAMIN KARIMLOO: To be honest, we didn’t grow up with the film and it’s not something we’ve seen. They’ve seen the show and loved it though. I’m lucky to have already accumulated “cool cred” with them thus far.

Gleb is not a character featured in the movie. Did you find this to be freeing or more of a challenge when bringing him to life for this adaptation?

I guess since I didn’t watch the film it was even more freeing as you say. Thing is, it’s Terrance McNally’s book that I wanted to play in. So I sort of just used my imagination based off what Terrance wrote and then used some historical references that I felt helped me. What I really wanted to do is just find the guy within the uniform and play around with the conflict he has to deal with – father, job and heart.

How do Gleb’s feelings for Anya conflict with his duties as a general for the Bolsheviks?

Whether its feelings specifically for Anya or what Anya represents for him, it serves as a major conflict. Gleb believes in his cause and “a new Russia” but well … he’s progressive … a bit. He’s trying to figure things out. And something he says in the song “Neva Flows” says a lot of how they feel of how things actually went down with the Romanovs: “My Mother said he died of shame.” It wasn’t supposed to have gone down like it did.

One of the central themes of this show is the importance of family. Gleb’s father was one of the Bolsheviks who assassinated the Romanovs. How did who Gleb’s father was shape who he is?

Well his father was in the military of, by nature, a stoic and strong culture. With Gleb following in his father’s military footsteps, he was of course very much shaped by his father and environment.

You also played Gleb in the 2015 workshop of this show. How have both the show and your character evolved from then until now?

When I signed onto the Broadway production, “Still” was written, which I was very pleased about. What we found in the workshop were the stakes that were created by his attraction to Anya. That put many things into question for Gleb and what he stood for – or what he thought he stood for. Like I said, he believes in his cause. But he also believe it’s better for Russia, for the people and for their futures.

In the show’s Playbill is a postcard that reads, “Tell us about your dreams & what you’d like to achieve on your journey below.” Underneath that text is a header that says, “On my journey I will …” followed by a blank space for each audience member to fill in their answer(s). If you were filling out this postcard, what would yours say?

Either “win” or “learn.”

You led the world premiere of Prince of Broadway when it debuted in Japan. Now that it’s coming to Broadway this fall, do you have any future plans to join the cast of that show when your run in Anastasia is over?

After Anastasia, I’m planning to take some much needed time in England with my family. But I had a blast doing Prince of Broadway in Japan. What a great experience! I’m happy to hang onto that memory.

You’ve coined the term “broadgrass” to identify the genre of your solo music. Can you please elaborate a bit about what this means? 

Really that term was a throwaway remark I made one day and it stuck.  We are at a point now that we just play and perform what we want to perform.  It’s amazing the following our concerts have created. It’s a group of friends every time coming along to join in. It was really a development of a live sound that organically found its feet from our love of the theater songs from shows I’m known for to songs I’ve written and of course to covers I love. I love the “grassroots” sound that comes from country, folk and bluegrass. So it was a way to coin a live sound the still incorporated our passion for theater songs. Broadway to bluegrass is broadgrass. We just love to play and sing songs that tell great stories. There’s a wide scope for songs like that.

What can your fans expect from your upcoming solo concerts at the B.B. King Blues Club & Grill in New York on July 23 and 24

I guess I would direct folks to my previous answer. More of that. We did a tour earlier this year and whenever that happens, more songs get added to our set list. So there are songs we’ve never done at BB King’s and this gives us a chance to do them.  More theater songs and of course some of the fan favorites!

You’ve collaborated several times with Sierra Boggess on projects ranging from The Phantom of The Opera to Love Never Dies to The Secret Garden. Why do you think you two work so well together and what’s a favorite memory you have from any of these productions together?

I always love working with friends. She’s been a family friend for a long time now. So when you have friends like that, there’s a shorthand that goes with that.  A trust.  She’s a lot of fun to work with. I really loved doing The Secret Garden with Sierra. That was a big discovery for me and to work on that show and book at the Lincoln Center was a real treat.

As an Iranian-Canadian actor, what are thoughts on the current administration’s attempted ban against Iranian citizens? And how do you think Americans can show the rest of the world that the prejudices of this administration do not reflect the views of this country as a whole?

You know, I have spent 15 minutes writing this answer then deleting. Then writing and deleting again.  I’ll just say its fear-mongering bullshit, and I think it’s important to accept everyone, no matter their beliefs or where they come from.

Ramin KarimlooAs a seasoned stage actor, do you have a preference when it comes to working on a revival of a classic or working on a new musical? If so, why?

I’m not fussed. Both can be exciting. A great show is a great show. It can be great to revisit a role or revive a hit from before. And it’s so exciting to create something from scratch. But you can approach anything from a blank sheet and have fun with your imagination and create.

For years now, you’ve alternated between performing on the West End and on Broadway. What do you find to be the biggest differences between working in these two iconic theater communities?

They both have their charms. England is home, obviously, but I do like being able to swap back and forth. I’m very grateful that has been happening. There’s a great sense of community for theater over here. There’s so much history in London and a great buzz in the West End as well. Support is great on both sides of the Atlantic.

What’s your musical theater dream role? 

I’m not sure! Maybe it hasn’t been written for me yet. But that being said, everything I have done so far has turned out to be a fantastic opportunity and ride. So I don’t really think about what’s a dream role. I wouldn’t want to just pin one. I just want to keep playing.



CLICK HERE to purchase tickets to Anastasia, now playing at the Broadhurst Theatre in New York.

Originally published on PopBytes