CHATTING WITH WITH ALYSSA MAY GOLD, CREATOR OF OFF-BROADWAY’S ALL-FEMALE “JULIUS CAESAR”

 JULIUS CAESAR HAS RISEN.

Julius CaesarThe classic Shakespeare play has reemerged as a topic of national debate. Due to the Public Theater’s new staging of the play, in which the Caesar character suggests a physical similarity to the current U.S. President, corporate sponsors have dropped their support for the production and pro-Trump protests have continuously interrupted the show. “Stop leftist violence!” and “New York Public Theater is ISIS!” proclaimed alt-right journalist Laura Loomer, who rushed onto the stage during the June 16th performance. She was taken away by security and was booed by the audience all the way out, but this hasn’t prevented similar disruptive instances to continue occurring during this year’s annual and iconic Shakespeare In The Park program.

For those who are familiar with the play, the fury and backlash that the Public Theater has endured hardly makes sense. After all, Julius Caesar is a play that warns against violent uprisings. It deftly illustrates how this approach is never to be condoned and clearly condemns bloodshed as a method to voice discontent. Yet the fact that this discourse has once again sparked such fervent conversation on a mainstream scale only further cements Shakespeare’s work as timeless, topical, and necessary.

Alyssa May Gold

Downtown from Central Park, another production of Julius Caesar is tackling the contemporary world through its unique interpretation of the text. Now playing at the Access Theater, Julius Caesar features an entirely female cast and sets the world of the play within the walls of an all-girls high school. I spoke with Alyssa May Gold, who plays Brutus and conceived the idea of this production, about the play’s enduring legacy, modern relevance, and much more.

NAGORSKI: How did the idea to set Julius Caesar in a modern-day all-girls high school come to you?

This all started for me with the idea of teenage Brutus. The first time I saw this play I was so fascinated by the way Brutus thinks, and the logic he uses to try to understand his feelings, and what’s right and what’s wrong and if something is wrong, what is his responsibility is to do something about it? It reminded me of what it felt like to be a teenager and try to figure out what my own personal beliefs were and what my responsibility was as an adult in the world. I started to build the world of this production from there and there were plenty of iterations before I realized that by making them all teenage girls, by going all the way to the opposite end of the spectrum as far away from Roman Senators in togas as possible, we could tap into the universality of the play’s message.

What is it about this play that lends itself so well to this current adaptation and setting?

Shakespeare was a master of using language to explore epic, heightened emotions and teenagers are the masters of feeling epic, heightened emotions so it felt natural to marry the two and allow the teenage experience the weight of Shakespeare’s words. Julius Caesar specifically works so well because most of the themes at the heart of the story are similar to those that we contend with as we come of age— finding a self-identity in the face of peer pressure, feeling isolated or jealous or betrayed, discovering the power you do have and navigating how to use it.

Growing up, did you attend an all-girls high school? If so, how did that experience inform this adaptation? If not, what type of research did you have to do to get a firm understanding of what those experiences are like?

Because the play is so expertly crafted, we didn’t want to do anything that was going to force the concept onto it. We wanted to allow the text to inform the world we’re creating so we actually went the opposite route and focused our research on ancient Rome, the events leading up to and following Caesar’s assassination, and the real people involved in it. I didn’t attend an all-girls high school but most of the parallels we found between this story and our high school experiences felt universally true to that time in everyone’s lives when all feelings are magnified to extremes.

What (if any) aspects of the original text had to be modified for this production?

The only major change we made was to the pronouns and we also turned almost every instance of “man” into “girl.” It gives me chills every time I hear Madeline Wolf, who plays Cassius, say “Girls at some times are masters of their fates” or our Antony, Violeta Picayo say “So are they all, all honorable girls.” Usually women in an audience are asked to do a quick translation every time “man” is used to stand in for “all of humanity” and it’s thrilling to upend that convention.

In the show, you play Brutus. Aside from the character now being female, how is your interpretation of Brutus different than what audiences might expect from the character?

Because my Brutus already looks so different from what people expect, I’ve tried to let the character as Shakespeare wrote him guide my interpretation. She’s still a deeply conflicted person who is attempting to do the right thing, who thinks of herself as very logical person but whose feelings (and actions) belie her stoic resolve. It’s been so exciting being in rehearsal with everyone and seeing how seamlessly we mesh with our characters—it’s a real testament to how wonderfully Shakespeare wrote about humankind. He wasn’t writing about men specifically, he was writing about all humans and how we relate to each other and the world around us and it’s been a real treat to get to tap into that.

How influential was the movie Mean Girls when you were bringing this idea to life? Where else did you draw inspiration from?

I picked up the play already aware of its strong connections to The Social Network and then definitely had the moment reading it when I realized “OH of course! It’s also Mean Girls!” but other than that there wasn’t a whole lot the movies could do to help because we’re relying solely on Shakespeare’s words to capture how these situations manifest emotionally in the world of a school. That’s been a really wonderful group effort in the room this past month and the stories people have brought in from their own high school days are chilling enough we haven’t had to look much beyond that for inspiration.

The show will be playing off-Broadway at the Access Theater through July 8th. What are your plans for it after this initial run ends?

I would love to give it another life and am doing everything I can to facilitate that but I would still strongly recommend coming to see it in the next three weeks. There’s a unique energy to the first time a company gets together to tell a story in a certain way and whatever happens after, the next three weeks are definitely going to be wild.

What have been some of your personal favorite recent Shakespeare adaptations, both on stage and on film?

The two plays from the Donmar Trilogy that I saw, Henry IV and The Tempest, are at the top of the list. I could talk forever about what it meant to see women play those roles but the most important piece of it for me was they were ultimately also excellent productions of those plays.

These don’t count as recent anymore (yikes!) but I also love all the teen rom-coms based on Shakespeare’s plays like She’s the Man, 10 Things I Hate About You, and the lesser known but just as classic Get Over It.

What is the primary takeaway that you are hoping audiences will leave this show with?

My biggest hope is that this production will speak to everyone, and in doing so, show how much we are all struggling with the exact same things. Adult or teenager, politician or high school student, everyone has a relationship to power and the struggle to understand how to use it when you have a lot of it or how to get more if you feel like you have none. The more people recognize how much we’re all in the same boat, the more opportunities there are to connect with each other and struggle together. I always want people who feel alone to know that they’re not.

What do you find to be the parallels between the almost warning call of this play and the political climate of today’s world?

The political parallel that I would encourage audiences of any production to hold onto is the power the people of Rome have in this play. Brutus spends all of Act 2 and most of the post-assassination scene working out how he’s going to spin this coup to the people. I would argue the one undeniable mistake Brutus makes is letting Antony speak at the funeral. The people’s allegiance turns on a dime three times over the course of the just the first half of the play—from Pompey to Caesar, Caesar to Brutus, and then Brutus to Antony, and their democracy is still destroyed at the end because they just follow whoever sounds the best in the moment. It’s a real lesson on how you have to be informed and make your own decisions and not be fooled by rhetoric or get swept up in group-think. You have to think for yourself and hold onto your beliefs. And if you’re 18 or older, vote. What you should get from this play is that you have power – use it.

How has the controversy surrounding the Public Theater’s current run of Julius Caesar impacted your production? What are your thoughts on how it has been received?

I think the play is a really human exploration of how people relate to power. There are a million ways to reimagine both the historical events of the ides of March, 44BC and Shakespeare’s interpretation of them and freedom of speech and expression are paramount to the ability to do that. I hope we always protect everyone’s right to both and keep each other safe in the process.


Julius Caesar

CLICK HERE to purchase tickets to Julius Caesar, now playing at the Access Theater in New York City through July 8.

Originally published on PopBytes

FRENCHIE DAVIS TAKES “THE VIEW UPSTAIRS”

FRENCHIE DAVIS IS NOT AFRAID TO GET PERSONAL.

The View UpstairsIn The View UpStairs, a provocative new off-Broadway musical set in 1970’s New Orleans, Davis plays the owner of the gay bar where the show takes place. Directed by Scott Ebersold and with music, book and lyrics by Max Vernon, The View UpStairs tells a poignant tale that not only examines the past, but explores how the lessons learned then can guide us in the fight for equality that still persists today.

Frenchie DavisDavis herself is bisexual and has deep family connections to The Big Easy. In her quest to bring The View UpStairs to life, she felt inspired by her own history to inform who her character is and why this story is so important for contemporary audiences. We spoke in detail about this journey, the role of art in today’s world, her days as a contestant on both American Idol and The Voice, and much more.

NAGORSKI: What has been the most exciting part about returning to the New Year theater scene?

DAVIS: The most exciting part of all of this, I think, has been being able to bring the character, Henri, to life and being able to be a part of telling this story.

The View UpStairs is inspired by one of the most significant yet all-but-ignored attacks against the LGBTQ community. As an LGBT woman yourself, you’ve been a vocal advocate for the community throughout your career. Is this what attracted you to this show?

Partially. I was attracted to this show because I thought the storytelling was witty and beautiful.  I believed that this is such an important piece of our history and was really honored to have been considered for it.

The View UpStairsHow does Henri differ from other characters you’ve played on stage?

Well, she’s this no-nonsense, leather-wearing black motorcycle lesbian running a gay bar in the South in the 70s. Let’s start there! But underneath all of that tough exterior, she’s vulnerable and she loves very deeply the community of people who frequent the lounge.

What do you think audience members can learn from The View UpStairs about the fight for equality today?

So much of the dialogue in the show reminds me that even though it may often feel like we haven’t progressed at all, we have actually come a long way. We have a loooooooong way to go, but we have progressed and we should never take for granted the sacrifices those before us have made to ensure that progress.

The View UpStairs takes place in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Have you ever been to New Orleans? If so, how did that experience inform your interpretation of your character/this show?

Yes, I travel to New Orleans often actually. I have family there and it is a place of such rich history. It’s the birthplace of jazz! It’s the only place where slaves were allowed to maintain and practice many of the cultural traditions they carried with them from West Africa. My grandmother got her doctorate in pharmacy in New Orleans! It was the closest city to her hometown where a black woman would have even been allowed to obtain a degree in any medical field.

So I carry all of that with me in bringing Henri to life. Yes, on the surface, the upstairs lounge is a shitty hole-in-the-wall gay bar. But for Henri, it’s a home. It’s a place she takes a tremendous amount of pride in. She’s a black lesbian in the south in the 70s, and yet here she is, running this business and using it as a safe haven for her LGBT brothers and sisters. These are the types of things that helped me to interpret the character of Henri and the show in its entirety.

As a vocalist, what are the most challenging aspects of singing Max Vernon’s score?

Belting F sharps!

Fashion plays a large part in this show as well. Do you have a favorite costume or look that you get to wear?

Well, Henri’s wardrobe is nothing like the stuff I like to wear. Although I have become a fan of the skinny black Levi 512s she wears. I can’t breathe! But I look good!

The show spans two generations of queer history. Who are some historic figures that have influenced you in your personal life?

Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, Angela Davis, Hattie McDaniel, and Bessie Smith to name a few.

 The View UpStairs runs through May 21. Do you already have a sense of where your fans can catch you next after this show wraps?

Probably singing at Pride festivals and doing my cabaret act at various performance spaces across the country.

Simply speaking as a theater fan, what’s your favorite show currently playing on Broadway?

That’s impossible to answer! I love so many of them. All for different reasons.

You’ve been a part of several iconic musicals, including RentDreamgirls and Cinderella. What is your musical theater dream role?

Oh my god, Magenta in The Rocky Horror Picture Show!

As someone who competed on both American Idol and The Voice, which show do you think shaped who you are as a performer more?

Neither of them shaped me as a performer. I was on TV for five minutes. I’ve been doing professional theater for fifteen years.

In 2012, you released your debut solo single, “Love’s Got A Hold On Me,” which went on to peak at #12 on the Billboard Dance Chart. Do you have any plans to release any other new solo music anytime soon? If so, do you plan to continue releasing dance music or are there other genres you’d like to tackle as well?

Well, I will always continue to do dance music. But I would love to do some ‘30s jazz/songbook stuff, as well as some soulful pop stuff. I also love trap music!

You’ve got two new movies coming out this year – We Are Family and Snapshots. As an actress, do you feel more drawn to the stage or to the screen? Why?

We Are Family! Oh my god, I filmed that like 7 years ago! I love both but theater is my first love. It’s what made me want to be a performer in the first place.

As a nation, we are going through some horribly dark, terrifying and divided times. What do you think the role of art is (or should be) as a form of making people feel safer and bringing them together? In other words, do you believe that art has a duty beyond escapism?

Art has always had a duty beyond escapism. I think that it is my responsibility as an artist, particularly as a queer artist of color, to use whatever platform I have to be a voice for justice and equality.

What’s your favorite thing to do to unwind after a show?

I love to come home after a show and listen to my ‘30s/’40s Jazz music playlist while engaging in herbal refreshments or alcohol drinking. Or both!


Click HERE to purchase your tickets for The View UpStairs, now playing at the Lynn Redgrave Theatre in New York City through May 21st.


Originally published on PopBytes

SEX TIPS WITH “RHONY” STAR SONJA MORGAN

Sonya Morgan

EVEN THOUGH THE REAL HOUSEWIVES OF NEW YORK CITY IS CURRENTLY BETWEEN SEASONS, SONJA MORGAN HAS NO INTENTIONS OF TAKING A BREAK FROM THE SPOTLIGHT.

Thus, the outspoken, brazen and wildly entertaining reality TV scene-stealer is currently starring in the Off-Broadway hit, Sex Tips For Straight Women From A Gay Man. And while Morgan is making her stage debut in the raunchy comedy, it’s far from her first outing as a professional performer. With a career in entertainment that spans decades, Morgan has done it all—from modeling to being a film producer to creating Caburlesque (her signature hybrid of cabaret and burlesque performance), and much more.

As she prepares to wrap up her run in Sex Tips on October 22, Morgan spoke with me about the play, her diverse and ever-evolving career, and her own favorite sex tips. She also reflected on the past season of Real Housewives and provided updates as to where things stand now with her Bravo cohorts.

ALEX NAGORSKI: Why is acting something you decided you wanted to explore?

SONJA MORGAN: I tried acting many moons ago when I was in Europe modeling. But I had gone to college for fashion marketing and, as it was my chosen field, I needed to return to the States and get to work in that area. After making good money modeling, experimenting in the acting field was a shock because you make no money at first. But I’ve always enjoyed entertaining and making people laugh, which I have continued to do over the years while developing my fashion lifestyle brand.

michael-milton-stefan-sonja-morgan-robyn-credit-allison-stockTell me a little bit about your character, Robyn. How much (if any) of yourself do you see in her?

Even though Robyn is mousy and an academic, I still relate to her. At times, I have been awkwardly nervous and uptight like her – especially when I moved to New York to attend the Fashion Institute of Technology. But my three gay roommates really brought me out of my shell and boosted my self-esteem.

Are you infusing any of your Caburlesque techniques into this performance?

Definitely! I use it in the delivery of the sexy lines to Stephan. And just like in my Caburlesque, during Sex Tips I am making people laugh and feel better about themselves.

What do you think your own unique and signature brand of humor adds to the comedy of the show?

I have a very similar sense of humor. I like to joke about sex and use the double entendre.

What’s the best sex tip you’ve ever personally received from a gay man?

Be yourself.

Do you think that gay men give better sex tips to women than other women do? If so, why?

Gay men are very open and honest. I think they’re giving people in general.

What’s the best sex tip you’ve ever given to or received from one of your fellow Bravolebrities?

I guess the best sex tip I ever gave Ramona was, “Never bring the boys inside the house when vacationing with friends. Keep them in the garden!”

What’s a sex tip you learned from doing this show that you had previously never heard before?

Well, I have a lot of experience at this point in my life, but I think the play has great advice. It’s funny, it’s sexy but it’s also a story of romance. I’m learning a lot from the experience itself – from working with the team, memorizing the lines, and seeing everything that goes into the whole production. After establishing Sonja Morgan New York, my new fashion jewelry collection, I’m really hitting my sweet spot – coming full-circle in my creativity center.

Your bio in the show’s Playbill is quite extensive. You’re listed as “an Entrepreneur, Luxury Fashion Lifestyle Brand, Film Producer, Writer, Performer, Special Event Creator, and Philanthropist,” amongst other things. Of all of these various responsibilities that you juggle, which do you feel most fulfilled and inspired by?

 I am fulfilled and inspired by all of it. I am being me and expressing myself from the core – through design, humor, special events, performance and the charities I support.

How’s your prosecco line, Tipsy Girl, doing? Where can your fans buy it and what’s next for the evolution of the brand?

The venues are listed on the TipsyGirl.com website and the restaurant is currently being held up by permits. I have been through this before, so I know how my partners feel. It’s a laborious and expensive process upfront.

Filming on RHONY wrapped a few months ago. Which of the ladies have you stayed the closest to in the time since?

As much as they tick me off, I’ll always be close to Luann and Ramona. I was happy to get back on track with Bethenny. I’ve always treasured our friendship. I felt my little “mom and pop” restaurant and prosecco venture was blown out of proportion by the press, exasperated by Dorinda creating a wedge, and Ramona was no help – adding fuel to fire. I’ve always felt Carol understood me, though she can have some bite in her snarky, yet very entertaining, blogs.

Have any of your cast-mates come to see you in this show yet? If so, what did they have to say about it?

Not yet. They always say they are so concerned, yet when I have something good starting up, I hear nothing. No tweets to say “Congrats.” I always support their new ventures. For example, I saw nothing re: my fashion and swimwear. Nothing. Why?

Looking back, what was your favorite moment of season 8?

Showing the viewers that I didn’t have a drinking problem by not partying at all. If I had a problem, I wouldn’t have been able to do that.

Out of all of the girls, who do you think was your biggest ally and your biggest adversary this past season?

I think Bethenny spoke her mind, in the usual fashion I am used to seeing, and she was very hurt. I think Ramona changed. She wasn’t herself. Though she never stands up for me, she is always there to hold my hand. Carol was neutral and there if I needed to talk.

Now that some time has passed, have wounds healed enough for you to attend Luann and Tom’s wedding this New Years Eve?

Yes. I’ve known Luann a long time. I know some things will never change. I’ve always said a man will never come between us.

[PHOTOS: ALLISON STOCK]


Click HERE to purchase tickets to see Sonja Morgan in Sex Tips For Straight Women From A Gay Man, now through October 22 at 777 Theatre in Manhattan.

Originally published on PopBytes

INTERVIEW: DIANA DEGARMO ON “THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES” AND RETURNING TO “AMERICAN IDOL”

The Marvelous WonderettesDIANA DEGARMO IS COMING BACK FOR SECONDS.

DSC_7619-848x1280In 2004, she placed runner-up on the third season of American Idol. Twelve years later, she joined her fellow past contestants (including her husband, season five finalist Ace Young) to bid adieu to the series at its epic send-off live finale.

But if she had any reservations about returning to the Idol stage after so many years, DeGarmo didn’t need to seek guidance farther than Suzy Simpson, the character she currently plays Off-Broadway in The Marvelous Wonderettes. With a first act set at a 1950s high school prom, the jukebox musical’s second act finds the characters coming back for their ten-year reunion. And for The Wonderettes, this reunion means getting back up on stage to perform for and with their peers all over again. Sound familiar?

As the 29-year-old Georgia native continues her limited run (through the end of next month) in the beloved show, she and I chatted about the Wonderettes, reliving her days on Idol, and much more.

What attracted you to playing Suzy Simpson, and how do you feel she differs from other roles you’ve played in the past?

Well, first and foremost, I loved the music. My mother is a big music fan and a big part of my childhood was listening to the music of her childhood. So it’s fun to go back and sing songs that I’ve known my whole life. And to sing them on stage in New York City is every performer’s dream!

Also, to be involved with a female ensemble-type show is really fun. Suzy is a great character. I do feel that she has a lot of similarities to other roles I’ve played. But at the same time, there are a few other surprises in the show that I don’t want to give away but that definitely make her a unique character for me.

You mentioned growing up with the music. Which specific artists from this era shaped and influenced your own musical upbringing?

Oh, golly. I definitely remember lots of Aretha Franklin happening around my house. Also “Stupid Cupid” was a big song that I loved growing up. It was really funny when I found out that was going to be a Suzy song. I was like, “Oh, I already know the words to this one!”

My mom had all of the greatest hits CDs of the ’50s and ’60s. But then it was fun too because the show introduced me to a lot of songs I didn’t know. Now I just love songs like “Allegheny Moon” and “Secret Love,” which Christina Bianco just kills every night.

In the show, you get to sing some of the biggest hits from the 1950s and 60s, including “Leader of the Pack,” “Son Of A Preacher Man,” “It’s My Party,” and “You Don’t Own Me.” What’s your personal favorite song to perform each night?

I think my favorite may be “Respect” from Act II. That’s a song that I have always loved singing. I do it personally in my shows just because it’s a great feel-good song for anyone who hears it. It’s got a good meaning to it. And for my character, it’s a big moment in the arc of her storyline.

In the first act, I also love “Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me.” I think that’s the only male song in the show, but of course sung by females. I love singing it and I love seeing the people that are fans of the music of the time. They kind of clutch their pearls or they squeeze their sweetie. This was a special song for them because it was a song for lovers back in the day. I love being able to help bring back those memories.

Between Hair, Hairspray, and now The Marvelous Wonderettes, it seems like you’re very interested in exploring American life in the 1950s and 1960s through your work.

There’s definitely a theme happening!

What is it about this period of time that keeps drawing you back to it?

I think I especially love the innocence of the ’50s and ’60s and just how everything was kind of a pure thought. There were no undertones to lyrics. Everything was just what it was. As a 2016 woman, there are some times when you look back at the lyrics to songs and you go, “Oh my God!” You know? They make your head hurt!

This was a time of purity where we sang what we felt and there were no crazy sexual innuendos. There was nothing promiscuous. Even just saying “Stupid Cupid” was a big deal because you said “stupid” in a song. Now, it’s hard to find a song that’s not overtly sexy and sexual. So for me as a singer, I appreciate the melodies of the music a lot. You can actually sing with the music. You don’t need a computer as accompaniment. You can just sing the song and the melodies are gorgeous and it’s a fun time. It makes people feel good. Yes, every single decade has always had its pros and cons, but I thoroughly enjoy remembering the good times of the ’50s and the ’60s.

You play one of the four song leaders who are called upon last-minute to save the senior prom after the glee club boys, who were supposed to perform, got suspended. Going back to your own high school days, were you more of a well-behaved Wonderette or a rebellious glee club member?

Oh golly! I was definitely a square. I’m still a square. I’m not a very good rule breaker. I like to have fun and I’m always down for an adventure, but if there’s any sort of rule breaking, I can’t do it because I’m not a good liar. Even though I’m an actor, I’m not a good liar. And I was on Idol while I was in high school, so the whole second half of it is kind of a blur. But I was definitely a part of the glee club and our choir back in the day and would have, I think, been thrilled to perform at my prom. And I probably would have been a little nauseous at the same time! Our prom was definitely not as glamorous as the Marvelous Wonderettes’ prom is.

Act two of the show finds the Wonderettes returning to Springfield High for their 10-year-reunion. As an actress, how does your approach to playing Suzy change when you’re playing her as a teenager versus as an adult?

The great thing is that the music that is in Act II actually helps us all tell our characters’ stories very well. There are some physical attributes that Suzy acquires in the second act, which definitely help put me in the right mindset. A lot can happen in ten years to anyone. I think Suzy is still a very bubbly and happy person, but she has had a very interesting decade and you find her in kind of a rough spot of her life. But she’s still the same young and hopeful person that she is in Act I. It’s kind of fun to see that everything is still going to be okay for her beDiana DeGarmocause I’m actually at the same age that Suzy is in Act II.

What do you think that showing these characters at such different stages of their lives adds to the overall themes and messages that the audience leaves with?

I would have to say the show overall could be a hopeful reminder that there’s always something good, no matter what. Yes, there can be chaotic moments in life, like with the prom or with our reunion, and you see that the girls have all kind of gone through something. But everything is going to be okay. And you can sing your way through it!

I think that’s kind of the overall idea of it – that it’s all going to be all right as long as you have your friends to lean on and to stand with. You see these four girls go through a crazy kind of scenario in the first half, and then they have to relive it in the second half all over again – but ten years later. I think that especially as females, we need our tribes. We need female friends to hang onto and to help lift us up when it’s our time of need and sometimes we kind of forget that. We get a little too independent. I’m an independent woman. I love my husband and he’s my best friend, but I definitely need my girlfriends sometimes. They understand better than anyone else.

You wrap up your run in The Marvelous Wonderettes on July 31. Do you currently have plans to stay in New York after that to do any more Broadway or Off-Broadway work?

I have some other things on the cook top that are currently boiling away, so I don’t want to reveal anything just yet. Hopefully there will be some news to report in the next couple of months. But I’m definitely going to try and stay in the city as long as I can! It’s so great to be up here for the summer. I live back in Nashville now and I love being there. It’s great to have kind of a touchstone back to the way I grew up, so it’s lovely to go back there. But New York is definitely alive and thriving, especially in the summer. Ace and I are having a blast being up here and we’ll see how long we can stay.

That’s awesome! You’ve also been a part of various musicals’ national tours, including 9 To 5 and Joseph and The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. What have you found to be the biggest differences between traveling with shows versus staying put in the same venue? Do the types of audiences vary a lot and does the location where you’re performing ever impact how you play your part?

Well, the hardest part, which is also the very exciting part, is that the venue is constantly changing when you’re on the road. So sometimes you can’t get comfortable. We’re very fortunate here. Doing The Marvelous Wonderettes at the Kirk Theatre, we know where everything is, we know how the sound works, and there are no surprises in the show anymore. There’s no, “Oh where did that come from?” or “We can’t use that that scenery piece” or “We have to change this.”

When you’re on the road, the show is a constantly evolving creature. It does keep you on your toes in a way, which is exciting, but sometimes it can get a little exhausting. I need a break! I just want to do the show and not think about, “Where is this going to come in from tonight?” or “When is that going to happen?”

I love being in New York. This city is a wonderful, great supporter of theater and I feel very fortunate to be back here for the summer. But being on the road was great too. I love getting a chance to take shows to people that may not ever get a chance to come to New York City. I love bringing them Broadway shows, and showing up in the theater and telling them a great story and entertaining them for a few hours. I’m a Gemini, and so I have two different sides. Half of me loves being on the road but half of me loves being here as well.

You’ve played the role of Fern/Vylette in a couple of industry readings of the musical adaptation of Jawbreaker. What’s the status of that show? And do you plan to continue being involved with it once it lands on Broadway?

I would love to be a part of it! I currently don’t know what the status is either. They don’t tell the actors those things. I wish I knew! I loved being a part of Jawbreaker. I’ve been with it for a few years, which is crazy to think, and the music is so infectious. The character of Fern/Vylette is so wonderful. It’s so fun to play a complete polar opposite human being in the same show. At the end of the day, it’s a great story about how you really have to be true to yourself and that beauty is only skin deep.

I think it’s got a great story – especially for today’s social media generation, where we see how everything looks so pretty and perfect online. But the reality is, it’s not. Life is not perfect. None of us are and I think that show highlights that. Particularly for high-schoolers.

It kind of reminds us that we’re all just human beings. I love that and I hope to see that it comes to Broadway one day. I’ve got my fingers, toes, legs, arms, everything crossed to be a part of it again. We shall see!

You have a movie, After The Sun Fell, coming out later this summer. What can you tell us about that film?

It was really quite a cool experience. We filmed in Lewiston, New York, just north of Buffalo. Lewiston itself is just this cute little picturesque town. I felt like the whole town was a movie set, but it wasn’t. We shot in a very historical building, this beautiful home. It’s a great small ensemble piece, but it’s a dark comedy, which I had never done before. I’m usually kind of in the more in-your-face comedy, so to try and do something more situational was really great. Everyone that I worked on the film with was so talented.

It was our lead actress’, Joanna Bayless, first film and she’s a theater actress, so she and I got to bond really well because I’ve been there. When it’s your first film, you’re like, “Wait, how does this work?” and “What’s happening?” I’ve been fortunate to do some other film work in the past, and so we got to buddy up. I loved that she always had her script on set with her. I was like, “See! That’s what us theater kids do. We come with the whole thing!” She is absolutely magnificent. The story is a play that has been transferred to film and I think it’s going to be a really, really cool new story not just for myself as an actor, but also for the indie film community.

As an artist, do you find acting or singing more creatively stimulating?

It depends on the day. It really does. Again, I’m a Gemini. I equally love both. I love the challenge of finding a character that no one would expect me to play, because when you meet me you’re like, “Oh, you can’t be mean or you can’t do this.” They may try to put you in a box and I love breaking that box wide open and saying, “Yeah, that was me on stage!” or “That was me in that show!” It’s fun surprising people.

I love going into music and singing stuff that’s from my heart. Living in Nashville has been a wonderful outlet for that. I’ve been getting a chance to really sing what I grew up singing, which is country music. I know most people know me for pop because I have sung it for a few years, but my heart lies in country music. And I love being able to sit down and just sing a song that really speaks to my heart.

Back in April, you performed on the American Idol series finale. What was going through your head during that performance, knowing it would be the last time you and any of the other previous contestants would ever be up on that stage?

It was really just like one big party! It really was just like a big family reunion the whole week we were there, which was really fun. We had a great time. I think the reality of the situation didn’t really hit anyone until the beginning of the live show when we all came out and sang “One Voice.” That specific performance number was kind of Nigel Lythgoe’s baby. It was his dream and vision to see everyone come out and sing that song. Everyone was kind of laughing and joking up until right before we started the show and then everyone kind of looked at each other and thought, “Holy cow, this is real! This is really happening!” It was very nostalgic but, at the same time, it was a little like if a party met a funeral.

We were all having a great time but then everyone got very somber. We were able to revel in the moment and it was a great show to be a part of and a great show to watch. And, I had fun getting up there and singing alongside my fellow artists and friends. Of course getting to share the stage with my husband and then some other friends from other seasons, we just all had one heck of a time.

Ace and I jumped on a plane right after the show and took a red eye here to do a reading back in New York so we didn’t get to party the night away with everybody. As they say, the show must go on! But it was wonderful and it was definitely a experience that, just like Idol itself, I will cherish forever.

Now that Idol is totally over, are you able to look back and pick a single performance of yours that you consider to be your favorite from your time on the show?

Because my season was back in the day, I’ve been very lucky to have had a wonderful career post-Idol. For me, Idolwas 12 years ago, so I was able to go back to the finale with a completely different mindset than some of these other kids whose seasons were like 2-3 years ago. I felt like a mother hen at the finale.

As for my favorite performances, I have two that I really loved. One would be when I performed for disco week in the top three. Meeting Donna Summer, who I’ve always looked up to as a vocalist, is still one of the most monumental and life-changing moments I’ve ever had. I remember asking her, “How do you keep your voice healthy? You still have such a gorgeous voice and you could sing the paint off the walls!” And she told me her trick was pineapple and Coca-Cola. I thought that was the coolest thing ever!

Then, I also loved when I performed for Latin week with Miami Sound Machine. Gloria Estefan was our mentor that week. She and Donna Summer are two very strong, iconic singers. As a young female performer, to get to sing her song that she made popular, and to perform it with Miami Sound Machine while on stage wearing a dress that Simon Cowell told me I “looked like a car wash” in – those are just permanently synched into my brain and into my personal life.

I’m sure! You haven’t released any original music since 2012. Do you have plans to return to the studio to work on your solo material?

Yes! I’ve toyed with stuff over the past few years, but when I’m in the studio, I like to focus on one thing at a time. I’m not a good multi-tasker. Right now I’m focusing on doing the show. So I’m being pulled in and out of the studio, but luckily Ace and I are building a studio at our home in Nashville. But I do have an album in the works. Hopefully it’ll be done as soon as we get back. There’s definitely lots of exploration that has happened over the last couple of years and songs have started creating themselves. I definitely feel there is another solo album coming your way. Hopefully sooner rather than later but the songs are there. I just need to get my butt in the studio to record them.

Will this album have more of that country feel you mentioned?

Yes, for sure. Definitely more of a country feel. It’s just continuing the music that I really want to sing. I’ve been really lucky because the past few EPs I’ve done have been more along the lines of who I am.

My first album, even though I love it and I support it because my name is on it, wasn’t entirely me. It was a baby of the record label that I was just happy to be a singer on. There are some songs on there that I love singing, but it wasn’t truly what represented me. I think that still, even many years later, I’m still trying to show the world who I am. But I guess that’s the whole part of the human experience, right?

Earlier this month, you and your husband, Ace Young, celebrated your three-year wedding anniversary. Congratulations! How did you two celebrate?

Thank you! We celebrated with a two-show day. We’ve had this tradition for several years now. We made a point to see as many shows as we could, so that weekend we went and saw The Robber Bridegroom and An Act of God. Then we saw American Psycho on its closing night. We want to see everything! It was a wonderful way to celebrate all weekend long because we don’t live here and I get so jealous that some shows close before we get a chance to see them. We’re always hearing friends talk about things and so we had a long list of shows we wanted to see. We loved each of those three shows. And Bright Star! Oh my gosh. Don’t even get me started on that.

Oh, I loved Bright Star!

I felt all the feels.

Yes, me too. Well, thank you so much, Diana. Is there anything you want to discuss that we didn’t cover?

I think the best thing for The Marvelous Wonderettes is that it’s a great show for anyone to come to. We take you on a trip down memory lane and we can give you a great lesson in some damn good music!

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Click here to purchase tickets to The Marvelous Wonderettes.

Originally published on PopBytes

INTERVIEW: “CRUDE” TALK WITH NICO TORTORELLA

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NICO TORTORELLA IS BARING IT ALL.

Nico TortorellaWhile on hiatus from his smash TV series, Younger, the hunky Italian-American actor is currently starring in Crude, a sexy, funny, topical, and original off-Broadway production. Written by Jordan Jaffe and directed by Kel Haney, Crude is now playing through May 21 at Ars Nova’s Theater 511 in New York.

In between performances, no topic was off-limits as Tortorella and I chatted about Crude, Younger, The Following, Scream 4, RuPaul’s Drag Race, Instagram, the new TV show he’s developing, and much more.

ALEX NAGORSKI: You’re making your off-Broadway debut with Crude.

NICO TORTORELLA: Woohoo!

Congrats! What about this play enticed you to want to try branching out from film and TV to focus on the stage?

Well, I grew up on stage in Chicago. I was studying at Steppenwolf and Goodman when I was younger. Over the course of five years, I played all three brothers in one show called Over The Tavern. It was a period piece, a 1950’s Polish family comedy. I was already doing 8 shows a week when I was a little kid, so doing Crude is kind of like a homecoming for me. It’s been ten years since I’ve been on stage doing a show outside of that little tap dance number I did with Sutton Foster and the Baltimore Symphony – which was incredible in and of itself, but that’s a whole other story.

I’ve been saying for years that I’m ready to get back to the stage and that I want to get back to my roots. Scheduling wise, it’s been a little bit difficult when you’re also working on film and television. And I’ve been living back and forth between New York and LA for so long, and finally I’m settled back in New York full-time. The opportunity came to itself time-wise and this show kind of just fell into my lap, and it was the perfect script. Jordan Jaffe just does such a good job of writing the way that I speak, if that makes any sense? It was a no-brainer. I read the script and was like, “Yes! Yes! Yes! When do we start?”

Tell me a little bit about your character, Jaime. How would you describe him?

He is your typical, upper-class Texas bro. He comes from a big oil family. I think that he had bigger dreams growing up of being famous and giving some big things to the world. He is a filmmaker and he was making all of these investigative documentaries when he was living in LA for a little bit, and then he moved to Texas because his dad offered him a job at the company. He tried to uphold his artistic integrity while working for the man. He’s split a little bit between what he wants to do, what he’s supposed to do, and how he’s supposed to support his family. So that’s kind of where the show opens … and it’s kind of all pretty much downhill from there.

As an actor, how do you go about getting into the proper headspaces to tackle characters as different and complex as Jamie and Younger’s Josh?

To me, people are the most interesting things in the world that we have. I’ve spent time with so many different types of people from all walks of life. I’ve spent a lot of time in Texas. I grew up with some of the richest kids in the world. I know their type, and I just kind of draw from personal experience and turn it into a version that speaks through me. There are always pieces of me in every character that I play. I think that even on a subconscious level, just in my waking life, I’m studying people all day, every day.

In its official synopsis, Crude is written up as “a dark comedy about the price you pay for selling your soul in the new millennium.” Could you please elaborate a little bit about how you interpret this description?

I mean, it’s working for the big rig oil companies, right? I think that that’s what that stems from. He and his family are just making ridiculous amounts of money, and he is balancing his personal beliefs on saving the world and dangerous chemicals with working for this big company. At the end of the day, we all have issues. It’s just that some are bigger than others.

nicoThe show warns against environmental disasters and chronicles the biggest oil spill ever – even bigger than the BP rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico six years ago. How do you think everyday citizens like you and I can help prevent something like this from happening again?

An oil spill? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. The technology is so advanced. For the most part, there aren’t restrictions or guidelines or rules until something bad happens. It’s not heavily regulated until something bad happens, you know? To drill that far down, into the ocean with that type of technology, it’s kind of inevitable. At some point, something bad is going to happen.

We don’t really realize what the full potential of everything is, but we all use the product every single day of our life. It is nearly impossible to not use petroleum products in our lives. There are literally a million different things made out of petroleum. Everything. Anything made out of plastic, everything we’re using when we’re heating our homes, flying, makeup … I mean … everything. And unless you’re living in the middle of fucking nowhere, under a tree, there’s nothing we can do. We’ve just got to keep on trekking and just pretend like it doesn’t exist.

As an artist, what has the experience of being in this play taught/shown you about both your work and yourself?

Oh man. This has been the first time I’ve really felt like an actor in a long time. I spent so much time when I was getting into film and television trying to tone down my acting. Since I grew up on stage, I was used to performing for large audiences and so everything had to be bigger. You spend so much time dumbing everything down for a tiny lens that’s sometimes only inches away from your face.

Getting back to work in theater, I’ve had to retrain myself what that beast is. This has been like a conservatory program for the last several weeks. These kids are all conservatively trained at Julliard. And working so closely with directors and writers, you know, that opportunity doesn’t really lend itself to television often.

Television is very fast-paced. There are tons of people that have hands in the pot. Everyone has something to say about everything, and at the end of the day, the actors’ creative influence is only so much. Being on stage, especially in New York and as part of a brand new play where I get to create this new character, has been so collaborative. It’s re-taught me what this art is and what it means. In Hollywood, in the big picture of everything, it’s very easy to lose grasp of what you do and what your art is because everything becomes so mainstream and about celebrity in a lot of ways, depending on what level you’re at.

Being in this play has just taught me that, oh yeah, this is what it’s all about. It’s about being vulnerable and open, and sharing the stage with somebody else and trusting each other, and keeping things fresh and jumping into characters. I could just keep going on and on and on.

That’s awesome! So now that you’ve gotten a taste of off-Broadway, is more theater – including Broadway – something you’d like to continue pursuing?

Oh for sure, 100%. I definitely want to do Broadway. I definitely want to do a musical at some point. I’d love to do a new musical. I know Frozen is coming. So there’s always a chance for that.

Of course!

I don’t know, dude, I just want to keep doing good work and it’s all about the projects.

In the show, Jaime starts out as a documentarian. You recently shot a documentary yourself, NicoNicoNico, with your brother, Rocco. What is this film about? And when and where will your fans be able to check it out?

When and where, yeah. That’s the big question. So NicoNicoNico is the umbrella brand of everything. We shot this documentary last summer, and he’s still working on it. I’m already at the next step, and for me that’s a TV show called NicoNicoNico, that’s in development right now. I’m sure that the documentary will come out at some point. I don’t know when exactly it will. It will probably just be like on some random Tuesday when I decide to make it open to the public. I’ll just drop it online somewhere.

That’s very Beyoncé of you.

Yeah, totally. I’ll pull a Beyoncé! Look, I’m always shooting something. The stuff that I release is really highly curated … but also not planned at all. I almost feel like I did it too long ago for it to come out right now, but not long ago enough for it to be a throwback type of thing. You know what I mean? I want to let it breathe for a second. And the second generation of what I’m working on right now is on a whole other level, so I almost want to come out with the second gen, and then go back and release the first.

Nico Tortorella

I see. Last season of Younger ended with quite a cliffhanger. What can you tease about season 3?

I know nothing! I know absolutely nothing. I know the writer’s room is putting it together right now, and they are planning shit out, and we start in a month. That’s the mystery of TV. I have no idea the direction that it’s going.

If it were up to you, where would you like to see Josh and Liza end up?

I want Josh and Liza to have a baby. I’ve been saying it forever.

You don’t think he should try to be with someone, for lack of a better word, more mature?

You mean less mature then, right?

Well, just because she’s older than him doesn’t mean she’s more mature. She’s still lying to pretty much everyone in her life.

Oh, yeah, good call! I’ve never heard it put that way. I appreciate that. I don’t know! I think that they are really good for each other in a lot of ways. I think that as her character progresses, their relationship will move somewhere as well, but I don’t know where. She’s a troubled one, that Liza.

What’s your personal favorite Hilary Duff song?

Hmm. “Chasing The Sun.” It’s the first one that pops into my head. Maybe also the only one that I know the title of.

How many tattoos do you have in real life? What’s both your most recent and your favorite?

Too many but not nearly enough. My most recent is a tattoo for my mom. We’re both Leos. It’s a lioness picking up her cub and on the lioness’ arm, it has “Mom” tattooed, so the tattoo has a tattoo. So original! And my favorite? Probably one that’s a portrait of my grandpa.

Something that’s become almost synonymous with your name recently is your presence on Instagram. Why do you think you’ve taken off with such a massive following on that platform? And how much preparation goes into all your shots – are they ever spontaneous or do you carefully curate each post to fill a specific purpose?

Yeah! I have a good setup in my house. I have a clam light, and a couple of other lights, and a camera set up. I do everything myself, for the most part, unless I’m shooting with a friend. I think Instagram has just been a really, really great outlet for everybody – but for artists especially. It’s just a free, open space for you to do whatever the fuck you want, whenever you want, and people get to see it. If they’re into it, more people will get to see it. And somehow in all of this, I’ve created a brand. And it’s taken off! I’m all about it, dude. It’s just an outlet that seems to have worked. And until it becomes something else, I’m here.

You’ve worked with Logo a bit lately and are an outspoken fan of RuPaul’s Drag Race. So I’ve gotta ask, going into the season finale, are you Team Kim Chi, Team Naomi or Team Bob The Drag Queen?

Oh, man. I think we’re all going to see Bob win, but I would love to see Naomi win. I’m just, like, Team Naomi’s body.

You were one of the central characters in Scream 4. What was it like to be part of such an iconic franchise and what’s your favorite memory from set?

It was incredible! That’s one of the greatest franchises of all time.

Traditionally, in every Scream movie they’ve shot, the actor that plays Ghostface pranked all the new actors. He would pop out or scare the shit out of you. They try to keep it a secret from all of the people that it hadn’t happened to yet. So I had no idea that this was happening! So I’m opening the door to go act inside Emma Roberts’ house, and Ghostface pops up, jumps in front of me, and everyone’s thinking that I’m going to freak out, or scream, or jump back like everybody else does. Instead, I just fucking clocked him in the face. Like, are you guys serious? I literally just punched him in the face!

When you’re not acting or working, what’s your favorite way to spend your downtime?

Just chilling out for the most part. I watch a lot of TV. I work out. I have a dope apartment in Williamsburg now. And I’m developing my own TV show. Sometimes I think that I have more hours in the day than other people do because I’m always fucking doing something. But with the little bit of downtime that I do have, I just try to not do anything.

What’s the craziest fan encounter you’ve ever had?

Honestly? Probably during The Following. Just being out with James Purefoy and seeing people think that we were actually fucking serial killers. I mean, people were genuinely afraid of us!

I bet you got a kick out of that.

Oh, totally!


Click here to purchase tickets to see Nico Tortorella in Crude, now playing off-Broadway.

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Originally published on PopBytes