EXCLUSIVE: INTERVIEW WITH EDEN XO

Eden xo

Eden xo is ready for pop domination.

It took a few false starts before she emerged as the confident and exciting songstress that she is today. The 25-year-old musician started out in a female-fronted punk band, Shut Up Stella, before moving to England to collaborate as a songwriter with some of the biggest hit makers it pop. When she returned to the US, she fronted Jessie and the Toy Boys, but after a handful of singles and a successful tour, she found her true artistic calling by rebranding herself as Eden xo.

Her infectious debut single “Too Cool To Dance” (iTunes) is rapidly being added to radio stations across the country, has been featured on the smash compilation Now 52, and was named one of “Tomorrow’s Hits” by Billboard. With over 900k plays on Spotify, the single is slowly but surely exploding into the mainstream, paving the path for a huge and pivotal 2015 for Eden xo. I caught up with the singer about her inspiration behind the song, her upcoming EP and album, her Norma Jean moment, her aspirations for the future, and more.

“Too Cool to Dance” is very clearly influenced by Madonna’s early material. Will the rest of your music continue to incorporate this throwback ’80s pop sound with a contemporary spin?

Yeah, absolutely. It’s a little bit late ’70s and early ’80s for me. Definitely early Madonna or Chaka Khan, Michael Jackson, and Sheila E. It’s funny because it’s obviously not my generation’s music at all. But being a dot com child of the internet, I discovered it recently and really fell in love with the musicality, the live horns, the guitars, and that whole feel. It was a real goal of mine to not just try and emulate that era, but really go to the source and try to make the record with people who were involved in that music. So the guitars were played by Paul Jackson, Jr., who played on a bunch of Madonna records. My favorite thing he did, though, was the rhythm guitar on “Thriller” for Michael Jackson. And then the horns are live. We have the guys from Earth, Wind and Fire – their horn sections play all those horns. So it’s absolutely throwback, you hit the nail on the head with the Madonna thing, but obviously with a 2015 spin.

You spent some formative years in the UK writing for Xenomania, singing backup for the Pet Shop Boys, and recording demos for Kylie Minogue. How did those experiences shape your identity as a solo artist?

Well, it made me realize I don’t want to be a songwriter. What I mean by that is I love writing songs for myself. If other people cut or use them, that’s great, but I always have this weird thing where it’s like, “Oh, those are my ideas, and this is strange that someone else is doing it.” When I was at Xenomania for a long time, I was kind of trapped in this writer role where I had all of these ideas, and Girls Aloud were coming in and singing them, and it was actually really frustrating in some ways, because, I was just like, “Ugh, this is not right…” It’s not how I intended it. So, the best thing I got out of it was I learned so much, because obviously working with Xenomania, and with Pet Shop Boys, and people like that, they’re just on another level. So they stepped up my game as a songwriter, but it just kind of reinforced how badly I want to be an artist myself and not only a songwriter.

Under the moniker of Jessie and the Toy Boys, you received the coveted honor of opening for Britney Spears on her 2011 Femme Fatale tour. What was that experience like and did she give you any advice on the road?

It was like everything I’m sure you’d imagine. I couldn’t believe that I was opening up for Britney Spears, arguably the queen of pop of our time. It was insane, especially for me. Growing up, Baby One More Time was one of the first CDs I owned. It was just like, “Wow, I can’t believe that she picked me,” you know? It was such an honor.

Advice? Not so much specifically like “Let me sit you down and tell you how it is,” but she has a great aura about her. Just being in her presence and seeing how her ship is run and how she operates and performs every night, you can’t help but to pick a few things up. It was great to be on that tour. I learned a lot and it was another stepping stone.

I bet! Have you seen her Vegas show yet?

No, I haven’t. I heard it’s really similar to the Femme Fatale tour though, because I think she basically just went from that tour to the Vegas show and then they added a couple numbers. So I feel like I’ve seen it, because I saw the other show every night for three months. But I haven’t seen the new show. I would love to. I love her. I will always be a fan.

What made you decide to drop the Jessie and the Toy Boys and reemerge as Eden xo?

Well, the truth of the matter is that after that tour, I was kind of in a very lost state. I mean, the tweets stopped coming in, the phone had stopped ringing, and I just was isolated and left kind of by myself. Because I was doing this thing, I was on this mission, like, “I’m independent,” you know, “fuck major labels, I don’t need you, whatever.” And, ultimately, it turns out that if you really want to have your music on the radio and out there to the masses, you can’t really do everything yourself and you need a little bit of help.

It was very humbling in some ways and I felt like I was such an underdog for so long. So I just threw myself into the studio and I was kind of in a depression. I started writing different stuff and I felt like I had changed so much and evolved so much as a person that I didn’t feel like I was the same person anymore. And so, I was thinking that maybe I should create a new project or whatever, just to have a fresh start.

Also with my sound changing and shifting from, you know, wanting to stray away from the electro thing and going more organic, I just felt like I was creating something new. And then when I thought of all of these names, I thought, “This is so lame.” I actually just wanted to strip away the gimmick and I just wanted to be myself. Then I was just staring at my driver’s license, because Eden is my middle name, and I looked at it and I was like, “Oh, there you are,” and it was staring me in the face my whole life and I just didn’t realize it. And now is the time. It’s almost like I had to go through everything to figure it all out. So now, when people call me Jessie, it’s actually strange to me. It’s really weird. I feel as though I’ve completely evolved. It was my Norma Jean/Marilyn moment.

What was it about “Too Cool to Dance” that made you decide it was the perfect debut single to launch this new chapter of your career with?

Well, it was the first song I finished, so that helped. The message of the song really resonated because of everything that I have gone through. It’s a fun pop song but, I’m tired of being in the corner, taking selfies and not dancing, in all forms life. I just felt like it was time to let loose and ask, “Who cares?”

And so “Too Cool to Dance” to me really hits a lot of points personally that I wanted to put out there, which is like, “Don’t care about what other people think, let’s not be too cool to dance,” and “let’s just enjoy life and have fun.” You can waste away worrying about what other people think and I just don’t care anymore.

The music video is super cute too. It features you stuck in a retirement home with your grandparents until your friends show up and save the day by getting everyone in the community to dance. How did you come up with the concept?

Thank you! I actually originally made a gif video myself. I did that version first and then the director saw that and it kind of inspired her to write the treatment she wrote with the older people. Because in mine, I have the random Asian Jazzercise club at the end and she was like, “Oh, my gosh. This is so brilliant,” and was like, “What if we did Palm Springs?” and la, la.

So, that’s kind of how it came together. And I liked her style, I liked her photography a lot. I hadn’t seen a lot of her videos but I kind of decided to work with her more based on her fashion photography, because I love fashion so much and I thought she had a good vision. So it was something we tried to focus on in the video with nailing the look of everything, and the clothes, and whatnot.

Do you have any ideas regarding the titles and/or release dates of your upcoming 5-song EP and your debut album?

Yeah, I do. I know that I’m not allowed to say the title. So lame, I know. But I do have the title. I have all songs mixed and mastered, everything’s done, and the EP is coming out in March. I don’t think they’ve given a date on the album, but it’s close to being done too. It’s at least all written. The album is on the way, but mostly the EP is the focus right now, five songs. It’s going to be awesome.

Which producers and songwriters are you working with to craft both of these records?

I worked a lot with this guy named Jesse Shatkin. I met him a few years ago and he, at the time, was Greg Kurstin’s assistant engineer and we had a writing session. We just had an instant creative connection, and we wrote something like eight songs in two weeks. So we were like, “Whoa, we’ve got to keep working together,” so we did. And I’m so proud of him, because he wrote “Chandelier” with Sia and had a massive year with her and that song, and now he’s up for Grammy for Best Record. I also worked with Tony Kanal from No Doubt and Jimmy Harry on a couple of songs. And then there was another collaboration with Fred Falke and Ron Fair, who I did “Too Cool to Dance” with. There’s another song called “Savoring Up My Love” on the EP that we did together, and I think that’s it.

Oh, and a lot of French influence somehow. There is this other French producer named Will Simms, who oddly enough does all these K-pop records but he is one of the freshest programmers I’ve ever heard. He had this beat, this idea, and we called the song we did together, “The Weekend.” That’s another song where we got the Earth, Wind and Fire horns in, and so it’s kind of another one of those mixed fusion moments of the old and the new.

Music isn’t your only forte. You also had a recurring role on the soap opera, One Life to Live. Do you foresee doing any more TV or film acting in the future?

I would really love to act more. I actually got my first movie offer a couple of months ago and I had to turn it down because it was at the exact same time I got the green light to put out “Too Cool to Dance,” so it was impossible to do both. It was kind of a weird and bittersweet moment where I was like, “Oh my God, I’ve been waiting for all of these things to happen and they’re both happening now,” and I had to make a decision. But music is my first love so, you know, that’s kind of why. But I think acting would be great. I’d like to find the right kind of role. I mean, One Life to Live was a good learning experience. It was like the basics, but if I’m to continue acting, I’d like to kind of pay my dues in acting the way I have in music – maybe start out in an indie feature or something like that.

What’s at the top of your holiday wish list this year?

Oh, my God. Sleep. No, I’m just kidding. I know it’s weird, but probably furniture. That’s such an adult answer. Where before it would be clothes and whatever, now I’m into furniture. I’m into design and … like, this is so weird. Any time I have a moment off, I’m watching HGTV and watching shows about flipping houses. And I’m like, “Oh, I want this like antique settee.”

What’s been your favorite album of 2014 so far?

Probably Ultraviolence by Lana Del Rey. I really love that. She’s incredible. I also love the new record that the Arctic Monkeys put out, AM. I listen to it all the time. It’s my jam.

Tell me a little bit about this online dance competition that you recently launched. I know that it’s happening now through December 31st, and it’s called “Are You Too Cool to Dance?”

Yeah. Basically, given the message of the song about dancing like nobody’s watching, it’s this fun opportunity I’m giving fans to win a trip to LA for two and to be in my next video for “The Weekend,” which will be filming at the end of January. All they have to do is make a video and upload it towww.toocooltodance.com. Dancing wherever they want. Some people think, “Oh, I’ve got to put a lot of thought into it, it’s got to be really creative,” but really, the simpler the better. It’s just whatever you feel. If you’re grocery shopping and you just want to break out and dance, just do it; capture it on film, and you could win a trip to LA and be in my next video.

So, just to wrap up, with all of the music you have coming out and all of the exciting things you have to look forward to over the next few months, where do you hope to see yourself this time next year?

I hope to have a #1 album, I hope to have Grammy nominations and I hope to be on fucking top. Finally. I really want a full album out. Because I just know that once people get to peel the other layers of the onion, it’s just going to change the game. There is so much I want to say, so much I want to do, and there is so much creatively that’s out there. So, really, as long as I can keep doing what I love to do and not have to wait tables, I’ll be happy.

eden-xo-2

Originally published on PopBytes

EXCLUSIVE: INTERVIEW WITH TOVE LO

Tove-Lo-1Tove Lo has quickly become Sweden’s most exciting musical import since Robyn.

Her brilliant debut EP, Truth Serum (iTunes), was released last month to rave reviews. A gut-wrenching record that chronicles the singer coping with the deterioration of a painful relationship, the EP calls to mind Jagged Little Pill – but with a sophisticated and contemporary electro pop makeover.

Currently hitting the road on her first ever American tour, Tove chatted with me about her upcoming full length album, her refreshingly unfiltered lyrics, her thoughts on drugs and tattoos, and more.

ALEX: Where does the name Tove Lo come from?

TOVE: Tove Lo has been my nickname since I was, like, three. Lo means “lynx” in Swedish, and there was a lynx that was named Tove at the animal park that I kind of fell in love with when I was a kid, so this has been my nickname since forever. It felt natural to keep it.

Last month at SXSW, you played your first ever U.S. show. How did that experience compare to playing in your homeland of Sweden?

I love playing in Sweden. The audiences there are very attentive and you can tell they’re really listening to what you’re doing. But here, the response was just amazing. The audience had so much energy, and the way that people are cheering you on kind of feels like they’re interacting a bit more. They don’t hold back from anything. And if I’m like, “It’s so good to be here,” they’re like, “Yeah, it’s so good to have you!” And I’m like, “Oh, thanks!” So that was a really big difference. Just the energy in general and that kind of openness – it’s awesome.

This week, you’ll also be playing your first ever New York show. What are you looking forward to most about performing in the Big Apple?

I’ve been to New York so many times and I love the city. I’m just so excited to finally play there and I hope there are going to be tons of people. I’m playing at The Westway, which is an old strip club, so I’m kind of hoping some people will take the initiative to get up and do a full dance. I know the poles are still there, so whatever they’re doing, I’m going to be super excited! It’s going to be really fun.

That sounds like such a fun time! The Truth Serum EP is so brutally raw and honest, and it really does an amazing job of detailing the various hardships and stages of grieving that people go through after a tumultuous breakup. Are all the songs written about the same person? And did you find that expressing yourself through your music gave you closure on this relationship?

Yeah, it’s all about the same person. It’s about the relationship from beginning to end. I didn’t plan to write it that way, but when I looked at the songs that I had when I was picking ones for the EP, I was like, “Oh my god, here it is.” I didn’t really figure out that it was going to be the full story right there until I looked and listened, and I was like, “Wow, here it is! Just the way it is!”

When I figured that out, I was very happy because I was so proud of it. But then I kind of got to this empty moment. It was like, “Oh, this is it. It’s done now. I’ve now worked through these emotions, and I’ve released all the songs.” So even though the EP is done, the story is done, and the chapter is closed, I kind of relive everything a bit when I’m on stage sometimes. I have some gigs that just really get to me and it’s like I’m getting thrown back into those moments that the songs are about. But yeah, I feel like it’s been kind of a closure. It’s been an interesting experience putting my emotions out there for everyone.

I bet. Do you prefer writing songs about despair or writing happy songs, and why?

I think despair. Outwards, I’m generally a really happy person — although I do have my moments. But I usually shut the door on everyone when I’m in those moments. So I think for me to get that out is good. I like writing about things that make you feel a bit of tearing in the heart. That’s what I love to listen to as well – something that kind of tears you from the inside because that emotion is just more honest to me. I feel better after writing a song that gets me through something that’s darker.

Later this year, you’ll be releasing your first full length album via Island Def Jam. Both thematically and musically, how do you think this record will differ from your EP?

Well it’s all going to be about my life, and keep that same kind of truthful, raw honesty. But it’s going to be more of a mix of the life that I’ve been living the last few years. Just everything that’s been happening and that sudden feeling of having all eyes on me. You know, that kind of feeling where you’re like, “Whoa, everybody’s suddenly very curious about who I am,” and you kind of realize, “Was it worth it to give it all away?”

To be so honest is the only way I can write my own stuff. So it’s going to be a lot of love and frustration and kind of what it feels like to be under the radar. I’ve experienced a little more and have gotten into a bit of trouble, so that’s going to be on there as well.

Right now, I’m going to keep writing for a while to see what else I can get out of me. Pretty soon I’m going to just start looking at what I have and figure out where I see the story and what I want to tell. It’s important to me that it’s cohesive. I don’t want it to be like one of those projects that’s thrown together with tons of different writers and tons of different producers. It’s going to be with my people that I like to work with and be very clearly, “Oh, this is Tove.” You’ll know that right away.

Do you have a title and/or release date in mind yet?

There is a deadline … but I’m not paying attention to that. So far, the working title is Embryos, but that’s all I have so far. I came up with the title for Truth Serum when I had all the songs and it was done and I was like, “What do I want this to be called?” That’s when I came up with that. So it’s going to be the same for the album. When I have it all done, I’m going to know what I want to call it.

In March, you released the music video for “Habits,” which includes some intense party sequences. Was there a specific scene that was most fun to film for you?

It was actually very hard to film because it was so emotional. But the most fun I think … it’s a combination because we had three nights out during that shoot. During the first one, we were in the good drunk place. We weren’t like, too drunk. We were dancing with all these people and that was really fun. The making out stuff was funny too. It was funny when we did the close ups because you feel so weird. Those are some of my best friends that are in the video, but I’ve never made out with them before. It was really kind of a funny and awkward moment to be like, “So, we’ve known each other for years, time to take this other places,” And we were just like laughing and that was really fun. But everyone was a good sport for making out with me for a week.

Drugs show up in a couple of your songs. On “Habits,” you’re using them to numb the pain of a breakup, while on “Not on Drugs,” you’re comparing them to the euphoric feeling you get when you fall deeply in love with someone. Have you received any backlash for being so open and candid about this topic? And if so, what’s your response to those critics?

I haven’t really looked at any comments or reviews. I’m trying to stay away from that stuff because it scares me. But I’m assuming that of course some people are going to be against it, and say I’m not a good role model and that it’s not good for young people to see this. I mean, someday it’s going to come. Especially with the song growing, people are going to have a lot of opinions about it. I know it’s provocative, but I like to do it that way. I think I’d rather have people react than not feel anything about it. It’s also that I write what I know and this is what I know. You don’t have to listen to it.

So what are your thoughts on the criminalization of marijuana?

Well, I think that if alcohol is allowed, I don’t understand the reasoning for why marijuana isn’t. That’s how I feel. Obviously, I’m not saying that I think alcohol should be illegal.

I totally agree. The “Stay High” remix of “Habits” has been blowing up ever since Ellie Goulding endorsed the song on her Instagram. How did that remix come into fruition and what appealed to you most about how Hippie Sabotage reworked the song?

It’s a very funny story, actually. There was a friend of mine who was like, “Hey, have you heard this awesome remix?” It was in a surf video that someone put up and I was like, “No, that’s amazing!” So I was like, “Who’s it by, who’s it by?” And they were like, “I don’t know, I think something Hippie?”

So then I found them, and was like, “Hey, I heard you guys did an awesome remix of my song, can you send it to me, please?” and they were like, “Oh my god, hi, yeah!” and they emailed it to me and said, “Here it is, what do you think? Do you have any opinions?” And I was like, “Only that it’s awesome and I want it on my EP!”

So we just kind of worked out all the kinks and got it on the EP and it just took off. I was blown away. I just love how they’ve made a proper dance remix of the song, but it still has that darkness to it. It’s just the way that they used all the parts. They did a genius job on it. I haven’t ever even met them, but obviously I think they’re great.

Speaking of collaborating with other musicians, you recently hit the studio with Adam Lambert to help write songs for his upcoming album. What details can you share about what you two cooked up together?

I’m sorry, I actually can’t talk about that at all.

No worries! You’ve worked with such coveted songwriters as Max Martin and Xenomania, and you’ve written music for various other artists – including Cher Lloyd, Lea Michele, and Girls Aloud. As a songwriter, how is your creative process different when writing for yourself versus when you’re writing for other musicians?

It’s all about getting in someone else’s head, really. When I’m writing for others, I won’t use my own experiences and my own stories because they’re not lived by that other person. It’s more like you connect to a feeling. Like, “Yeah yeah, I’ve had that feeling, let’s write about that feeling.” I try to just get into their heads and try to imagine what they would want to say and how they would say things. It helps if you’ve met them or if you know them, or if they write themselves, and you can do it together. The biggest thing is seeing from someone else’s perspective.

What are your thoughts on the resurgence over the past few years of Swedish artists being infused into American pop culture (i.e. Robyn, Icona Pop, Lykke Li, Loreen, iamamiwhoami)? Do you think there’s something distinct and inherent about Swedish music at its core that American listeners are attracted to?

Yeah! I’m so excited that there’s so much good stuff coming out of Sweden. I’m really a big fan of a lot of it. I think there’s a sort of darkness to it, and is a little bit melancholy, and I think that part speaks to a lot of people. Maybe there’s a type of directness and a kind of very lyrically clever theme that sometimes is a bit more honest, and not as edited or thought through as it might otherwise be.

This is actually something I’ve been thinking about, but I think it might also be because English is our second language. It’s much easier for me to express myself in English because there is that little distance to overcome. I can say things that are so personal and mean so much to me, but if I were to sing the same things in Swedish, it would feel like, “Whoa. That hit too hard.” Maybe we’re able to say things more honestly in English because there is a little bit of a distance. Does that make sense? But for you, when English is your first language, that goes straight to your heart and I think that maybe a lot of people can feel the connection. So maybe that’s why we dare to sing about it more than if it was in our first language. That’s my little analysis.

That’s so interesting! I hear you’re very big into tattoos. How many do you have and which one would you say is your favorite?

I have three, all in decent places. I have two that are from the painter, Mark Ryden. I love his stuff and it also reminds me of my time in my old band. There’s one on my left upper arm and one on my right lower arm. Then I have a little super ugly scorpion that’s tattooed under my right collarbone, which I don’t know what I’m going to do about. I mean, it’s part of me now, but it’s so ugly! It’s the worst. But I think my favorite is actually the one on my shoulder. That’s actually how a lot of people recognize me. I always figured I had an ordinary face, so when people see that, they’re like, “Oh my god, it’s you!” It’s pretty funny.

Well thank you so much, Tove! This has been great. Is there anything else you’d like to add about your tour, EP, or upcoming album that we didn’t discuss?

I don’t think so! I think we covered the lot of it. Thank you so much!

Tove Lo

Originally published on PopBytes

“CALL MY NAME” BY CHERYL COLE (SINGLE REVIEW)


28-year-old UK pop sensation Cheryl Cole has been poised to break America for quite some time now.

In her home country, Cheryl is a household name. As part of pop group Girls Aloud, Cheryl had twenty top ten consecutive hits, including four number #1s. She then landed two #1 hits of her own with “Fight For This Love” and “Promise This” after launching a solo career in 2009.

With a resume like that, one would assume that Cheryl would have at least been on the radar of American audiences. Yet her music never attracted the airwaves of US radio, causing her to be relatively unknown this side of the Atlantic.

Following a successful stint as a judge on the British version of The X Factor from 2008-2011, Cheryl was offered a spot by Simon Cowell on the judges’ panel of the reality show’s American incarnation. Finally it seemed as though she was going to get her chance to make her real introduction to the land of the free and the home of the Big Mac.

But then like the venomous cockroach that she is, Nicole Scherzinger struck down with her reign of terror and ruined everything. It was almost Shakespearean; the way Nicole poisoned her competition. One devious plan later, Cheryl was out just weeks into the initial auditions and guess who was suddenly first in line to be her replacement? What’s done is done, indeed, Lady Macbeth.

Maybe it’s true then that the third time’s a charm. Because with her new single, “Call My Name,” Cheryl has delivered a smash so massive, its chart impact will most likely be felt across the world. And this time around, America will be no exception.

Released this morning on British radio, “Call My Name” marks the debut collaboration between Cheryl and hit-making producer Calvin Harris. His Midas touch for monster hits (i.e. Rihanna‘s “We Found Love“) and signature emphasis on gargantuan electropop hooks (i.e. Scissor Sisters‘ “Only The Horses“) makes for the perfect formula to re-launch Cheryl from a national into an international pop treasure.

And while Harris’ formula is in no way innovative or boundary pushing, it’s a catchy one that fits perfectly with Cheryl’s voice. We don’t say that Cheryl’s always sounded more like Britney than Christina. We don’t say that she’s not exactly the vocalist of her generation. But now we said it. And if Cheryl is looking for a global genre takeover, submerging herself into a pool of electronica-amplified dance/pop is without question the way to go.

“How do you think I feel when you call my name/ You got me confused by the way I changed/ How do you think I feel when you call my name/ My name/ Say my name, baby,” Cheryl croons over the fist-pump-inducing and addictively repetitive chorus.

The lead single from Cheryl’s upcoming third album, A Million Lights, “Call My Name” is the closest contender so far to being the song of the summer. Which only goes to show that sometimes a feel-good generic dancefloor anthem goes a lot further than a messy mashup of too many genres and sounds (are you taking notes, Nicki Minaj?).

A Million Lights, out in the UK on June 18th via Polydor Records, features collaborations with Alex Da Kid, frequent musical partner Will.I.Am, the glamorously infamous Lana Del Rey, Jim Beanz and newcomers Pantha and HyGrade. With a roster as impressively fruitful as that, it’s pretty safe to assume that Cheryl will score her third #1 album in a row.

And while details of a US release for A Million Lights have yet to surface, Cheryl Cole is a name that American audiences are about to become increasingly familiar with. The singer will be appearing in the upcoming chick-flick What To Expect When You’re Expecting (starring Cameron Diaz and Jennifer Lopez) and has reportedly been offered a role on ABC’s smash sitcom, Modern Family. Meanwhile, the now unemployed Nicole Scherzinger (can you say karma?) is still trying to track down the e-mail addresses of the producers of Where Are They Now?.

With an accompanying Anthony Mandler-directed music video set to drop on Vevo on May 2nd, “Call My Name” is the ticket Cheryl has been waiting for to become America’s favorite new British import. It may not be her first single, but the song marks the debut of a huge new era and turning point for Cheryl – one in which she breaks out from her comfort zone and dominates pop charts everywhere.

Don’t be surprised once Call My Name takes over clubs and airwaves. Between the release of this explosive new single and Cheryl’s string of upcoming high profile appearances, it looks like America will finally catch on and start calling her name after all.

Originally published on HardCandyMusic