REVIEW: THE REBIRTH OF BROADWAY’S “SIDE SHOW”

Side Show

Side Show 1997In 1997, a musical called Side Show based on the true story of Depression-era vaudeville stars and conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton opened on Broadway. While the show would go on to receive four Tony Award nominations (including an unprecedented shared Leading Actress nomination for co-stars Alice Ripley and Emily Skinner), its lukewarm critical reception and poor ticket sales caused it to close after only three months and 91 performances.

Fast forward to 2014. Side Show has been retooled and rebirthed into a spectacular and must-see Broadway experience. It’s a rare second chance that builds upon and improves its source material to create something fresh, contemporary, and as visually stunning as it is musically brilliant. And just like that, Michael Keaton’s Birdman is not the only one flying his freak flag at the St. James Theatre these days.

Academy Award-winner Bill Condon (“Chicago” and “Dreamgirls”) directs this new darker take, and contributes additional book material that focuses on numerous recently discovered biographical details about the Hilton sisters. For instance, the characters of Auntie and Sir, who helped with the birth of the twins but abused them through their adolescence in an attempt to make a profit off of them, take pivotal supporting roles here; they were not featured at all back in 1997. Also not included in the original was the character of Harry Houdini, who appears briefly in the new production to teach the sisters the value of sticking up for oneself and how to ignore critics. His song is aptly called: “All In The Mind.”

Side Show

And it’s not just the show’s book that has been revised. Author / lyricist Bill Russell and composer Henry Krieger have reworked the music to include orchestrations by Harold Wheeler and musical direction by Sam Davis. Performed by a live orchestra, the score also incorporates plenty of new songs. They include “Ready to Play,” a big number that the twins sing upon arriving in America; “Cut Them Apart,” sung by threatening doctors during a horrifying flashback scene; and “Very Well Connected,” which the Hiltons’ future agent Terry sings while trying to convince them to leave the side show. This also means that a number of songs from the original production were either cut or condensed, making this “Side Show” truly feel like a completely new musical.

Bringing the Hilton sisters to life are Great White Way veterans Erin Davie and Emily Padgett. As Violet, Davie sympathetically plays the more introverted, quiet and naïve sister, while Padgett’s Daisy is brazen, relentless, flirty and full of charisma. As the sisters begin to fall in love and start feeling the effects of fame, the closeness of their relationship never wavers, even at the suggestion that they may be surgically separated. And though their journey may find them yearning for different things at times, their undying support for one another and the self-sacrifice they’re always willing to make for the other is nothing short of beautiful and inspiring. That beauty is on dazzling display in the show stopping, best song, “I Will Never Leave You.”

Side Show

While it’s difficult to pit these two performers against one another when they’re literally connected at the hip on stage, it’s Padgett who truly shines as the show’s MVP. Davie is undoubtedly a colossal talent, but Padgett’s zesty interpretation of Daisy is packed with perfect comedic timing and scene-stealing panache. And her sublime belting is alone worth the price of a ticket. Mixed with Davie’s more traditional soprano voice, Padgett’s power pop tendencies are amplified to a breathtaking sound that should satisfy fans of classic and contemporary musicals alike.

Davie and Padgett bring to life the yin and yang of the sisters’ complex opposing personalities with enough contrast and heart to carry the entire show on their own. Luckily, though, they don’t have to because the entire cast is superb. As Jake, a man hired to watch over the girls, David St. Louis is a force to be reckoned with due to his supremely rich and honey-smooth baritone voice. From “The Devil You Know” to the gorgeously somber “You Should Be Loved,” his passionate delivery is the stuff that turns actors into stars. The same can be said for Ryan Silverman, whose rendition of Terry’s “Private Conversation” is a jaw-dropping master class in tenor performance. And in no recent memory has an entire ensemble been as in sync as during the closing notes of the Act I finale, “Who Will Love Me As I Am.” With its layers of harmonies and massive cast, the show pulls off the incredible feat of making these performers all sound like one very powerful voice.

To create the illusion of Davie and Padgett being conjoined, costume designer Paul Tazewell had to prepare outfits that could both hold the ladies together and stay intact during dance numbers. He used numerous zippers, magnets and sewn-together threads to achieve this. “It was important to know where to trick the eye,” he told The Associated Press. Ranging from the grim, nightmarish, Tim Burton-esque look of the opening carnival to the glamorous and sparkly world of Hollywood, the meticulously crafted costumes tell the story of the Hiltons’ rise to stardom in a remarkable way. The imaginative team behind the new Side Show has accomplished something truly stunning. They’ve not only resurrected a cult hit, but also transformed it into the strongest contender for Best Musical Revival at next year’s Tony Awards.

Side Show

Get your tickets here. Just like the tagline promises … it will never leave you.

Side Show

Originally published on PopBytes

REVIEW: JOAN DIDION & VANESSA REDGRAVE COLLABORATE FOR ‘BLUE NIGHTS’

“When we talk about mortality we are talking about our children.”

This powerful sentence appears frequently in Joan Didion’s haunting 2011 memoir, Blue Nights, and was repeated a number of times at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in NYC on Monday evening during a special one-night-only reading from the book by renowned actress Vanessa Redgrave.

Blue Nights

Blue Nights is the acclaimed and characteristically evocative follow-up to Didion’s classic The Year of Magical Thinking, a memoir detailing her grieving process after the sudden death of her husband, writer John Gregory Dunne. Blue Nights, published six years later, chronicled how she dealt – and continues to deal – with the passing of her then 39-year-old daughter, Quintana, just before Magical Thinking was published.

In their review of the book, The New York Review of Books wrote, “‘We tell ourselves stories in order to live,’ Didion famously wrote in The White AlbumBlue Nights is about what happens when there are no more stories we can tell ourselves, no narrative to guide us and make sense out of the chaos, no order, no meaning, no conclusion to the tale. The book has, instead, an incantatory quality: it is a beautiful, soaring, polyphonic eulogy, a beseeching prayer that is sung even as one knows the answer to one’s plea, and that answer is: No.”

But before writing Blue Nights, Didion turned The Year of Magical Thinking into a one-woman Broadway play. Redgrave, a close friend of the writer’s for decades, starred in the riveting adaptation, which won her a Drama Desk Award and a Tony Award nomination. Yet there’s even more that connects these two extraordinary women.

Like Didion, Redgrave knows what the pain of losing a child feels like. In 2009, her daughter Natasha Richardson died from an epidural hematoma that occurred during a skiing accident. Richardson, whose first marriage took place in Didion’s apartment, was a good friend of Quintana’s during their teen years – something that Didion remembers fondly in Blue Nights.

“Magical thinking is when we believe that the past can be reversed, somehow,” Redgrave said in a press statement. “Blue nights are when everything has a future. For many of us, that means our children. When the blue nights end, we each confront the ludicrous enigma ‘Why can’t I be who I was? Why can’t I wear the black tights and hooped earrings that made me feel I knew who I was?’”

She continued that she hoped that those who attended the event – including familiar faces such as Ralph FiennesMatthew Broderick, and Emma Roberts – would find “a curious solace – and laughter – in Joan’s strange encounters with those who try to assist us with coping.”

Hearing Redgrave deliver Didion’s moving words was, as expected, a deeply emotional and sometimes even difficult experience. The knowledge that these two women, previously bound together as lifelong friends and now as grieving mothers, added layers to the reading. “When we talk about mortality we talk about children,” Redgrave repeated, filling the Cathedral with that heavy sentiment that would define why the evening was so special.

“This was never supposed to happen to her,” Redgrave read from the chapter about Richardson, echoing a feeling she too no doubt constantly grapples with. Seated in an armchair, she lifted her gaze from the page and onto the audience as she spoke those words. Her delivery was calm yet heartfelt, with each syllable carefully pronounced to give justice to the full rhythmic effect of Didion’s stunning prose while simultaneously honoring the memory of their children.

The end of each chapter was marked with a short piece of music on the trumpet-flugelhorn by guest artist Jimmy Owens, 2012 NEA Jazz Master and leader of Jimmy Owens Plus. All of the selections he played were as somber as they were beautiful, emphasizing the lingering melancholic atmosphere that consumed the room each time that Redgrave turned the page. These interludes offered the audience a quick break to collect themselves before Redgrave began to read again.

The Cathedral of St. John the Divine also holds a special significance for Didion. Not only is it where Quintana was married, but it’s where she, John Dunne, and Didion’s mother are all inurned. The idea that her ashes were in the surrounding walls added a somewhat poetic quality to the reading, almost as if she, too, were present and listening to her mother’s touching homage.

A benefit for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS and Cathedral Community Cares, the event underlined just how profound Didion’s legacy has become. Last year, she received the National Medal of Arts and Humanities from President Obama. And just last month, a documentary that her nephew Griffin Dunne is directing about her life and impact raised its initial $80,000 goal in just one day onKickstarter.

Redgrave finished the reading by focusing on passages from the end of Blue Nights in which Didion recounts how she has managed to find meaning and purpose in a world that has robbed her of so much. “The fear is for what is still to be lost,” she read. “You may see nothing still to be lost. Yet there is no day in her life on which I do not see her.”

As a result of the poignancy of Blue Nights and Redgrave’s raw performance of its text, Quintana and Richardson will never “pass into nothingness” like “the Keats line that frightened her.” All those who were lucky enough to attend this incredible reading left firmly convinced on that score. They also left deeply moved, pondering many of life’s most difficult questions.

PHOTO | BRIGITTE LACOMBE

Originally published on PopBytes

JOAN DIDION & VANESSA REDGRAVE REUNITE FOR ONE-NIGHT-ONLY!

Joan Didion & Vanessa Redgrave

Joan Didion and Vanessa Redgrave are teaming up again.

Seven years after Redgrave starred in the one-woman Broadway adaptation of Didion’s National Book Award winning memoir The Year of Magical Thinking, the duo are reuniting for a staged reading of Blue Nights. Taking place on November 17 at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, this one-night-only event will benefit Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS and Cathedral Community Cares.

The Year of Magical Thinking chronicled the year following the death of Didion’s husband, John Gregory Dunne, who died unexpectedly of cardiac arrest in 2003. Blue Nights, her highly anticipated follow-up memoir, focused on her daughter, Quintana Roo, who tragically died right before The Year of Magical Thinking was published–and just two years after the passing of her husband. Written with Didion’s trademark gorgeous sentence structure and heart-wrenching honesty, the book took its readers on an evocative journey through grief, aging, memory, parenting, and finding purpose in a world where it seems there’s none left.

“I hadn’t dealt with Quintana,” Didion told the Los Angeles Times during a 2011 interview about why she wrote Blue Nights. “I had dealt with her to some extent in the play … but the play [was] a … way of preserving myself at a distance. Because as I say in the book, watching that play on 45th Street at night was one moment during the day when Quintana did not necessarily die.”

Redgrave, who won a Drama Desk Award and was nominated for a Tony for The Year of Magical Thinking, shares the unimaginable experience of losing a child with Didion. In 2009, her daughter, Natasha Richardson, died in a calamitous accident.

According to press materials, “the actress, the author and the venue have long shared an extraordinary affinity: Richardson’s first marriage took place in Didion’s home; and The Cathedral of St. John the Divine is where Quintana was married, and where Quintana and John Gregory Dunne are inurned.”

During the 8PM reading of Blue Nights, Redgrave will be joined by guest artist Jimmy Owens, 2012 NEA Jazz Master and leader of Jimmy Owens Plus, on the trumpet-flugelhorn. With all of these elements combined, Blue Nights sounds like an evening that’ll be as unforgettable as it will be poignant.

Tickets for Blue Nights range from $40-$175 and can be purchased at stjohndivine.org or by calling 212.316.7449.

PS Don’t forget to come back here for my full review after the event.

Originally published on PopBytes

FIVE REASONS NOT TO MISS “THE COUNTRY HOUSE” ON BROADWAY

The Country House

Broadway is no stranger to plays that pay tribute to Anton Chekhov.

Donald Margulies’ The Country House, the latest offering from the Manhattan Theatre Club, is easily the wittiest homage to the prolific Russian playwright since the outrageous Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. Taking place all under one roof, this new play follows the reunion of a family at their summer house one year after the death of one of their immediate members. What ensues is a dramedy chock-full of revealed family secrets and issues, declarations of love, self-discovery, lust, and all-around mayhem.

Here are five reasons not to miss The Country House on Broadway this fall (and while you’re at it–check out my list of ten other shows not to miss):

1–BLYTHE DANNER RETURNS TO THE BROADWAY STAGE

Two-time Tony Award winner Blythe Danner (The Miser; Butterflies Are Free) hasn’t been in a Broadway play since 1998. Sure, she’s been in a couple of musicals since then, but Danner’s acting roots are firmly planted in dramatic productions. With The Country House, she makes a triumphant return to form as Anna Patterson, the matriarch of a family recovering from the recent death of her daughter, Kathy. Anna also happens to be a renowned stage actress, allowing for Danner to take on a self-aware role that shows off both her comedic timing and vast dramatic range. Come time for the Tony Awards, Danner could be collecting her lucky number three.

The Country House

2–SARAH STEELE STEALS THE SHOW

While Danner is undoubtedly a force to be reckoned with, it’s 26-year-old Sarah Steele who leaves the most lasting impression after the curtain closes. Steele has been steadily building an impressive resume that boasts such television credits as The Good WifeGirlsNurse Jackie, and Gossip Girl. Now, her dynamic Broadway debut as Anna’s granddaughter truly announces the arrival of a new star. As Susie Keegan, Steele is simultaneously the heart of the show and its most relatable character. She keeps the rest of her family grounded by always pointing out the truth with her often hilariously dry humor, while also providing the play’s most poignant moment when she confronts her uncle about how poorly he’s handled the death of his sister.

Sarah Steele

3–JOHN LEE BEATTY’S SET DESIGN

All of The Country House takes place inside a cozy living room. Set in a house in the Berkshires, the bucolic room is decorated with big sofas, Persian rugs that clash with the furniture, rich wooden bookshelves, a carpeted staircase, pastel curtains, rustic lamps, and wide open white doors. It’s practically impossible to look at the room and not want to snuggle up under a blanket there with a cup of tea on a rainy day. The house is meticulously detailed to look like a New England utopia saturated with decades of memories, almost making it a character in itself.

4–DIVERSE DEPICTION OF GRIEF

The play gradually reveals just how all the characters have been impacted by Kathy’s death. After a year of feeling lost and depressed, Anna decides to get back into acting by signing onto a production of Mrs. Warren’s Profession at the Williamstown Theatre Festival. Acting is what she knows and does best, and she can begin to pick up the pieces of her life again by re-immersing herself in that world. Kathy’s widower, Walter (David Rasche), has already brought his new fiancée (Kate Jennings Grant) over to meet his family and help him cope with the anniversary of his wife’s passing. Elliot (Eric Lange), Anna’s son, turns to booze and drug use as a coping mechanism, terrorizing not only himself but also everyone around him. Kathy’s former flame, famous actor Michael Astor (Daniel Sunjata), is also appearing at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, and crashes at the Patterson home while his hotel undergoes renovations. He remembers Kathy fondly but is riddled with guilt over not attending her funeral. And Susie, home from college for the summer, acts as the voice of reason, keeping the group from coming apart. The roles that are assigned to each of these characters illustrate not just the different ways in which people grieve, but how a person’s presence can be constantly felt even after they’re long gone.

5–COMMENTARY ON SHOW BUSINESS

Aside from Susie, every character in The Country House works in the entertainment industry. Walter, a huge Hollywood director, is perfectly content making sequel after sequel in an action franchise that sees no sign of slowing down at the box office. He’s engaged to Nell, an out-of-luck actress he happened to meet at a Starbucks following a botched audition. Formerly a theater director, Walter addresses the stigmas that sometimes come with switching mediums and the idea of selling out. On the flip side, Michael is raking in millions as the face of a mindless TV phenomenon and thus turns to classic theater as a way of validating his craft and rediscovering himself as an actor. It’s established that Kathy was a well-known actress in her own right, which makes it even harder for Elliot to step out of his family’s shadow. As a result, the failed actor turns to playwriting as a desperate attempt at calling himself an artist, but ultimately can’t make that work either. Then, of course, there’s Anna, once an ingénue and now resigned to playing the role of the “old lady” in practically any project she chooses, despite the fact that she has very many years ahead of her. All of these characters provide stark contrasts and fascinating explorations of fame, acting, and how success is measured within the context of something as subjective as art.

The Country House is playing now through November 23rd at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre–get your tickets here.

The Country House

PHOTOS | JOAN MARCUS VIA THECOUNTRYHOUSEBWAY.COM

Originally published on PopBytes

TEN MUST-SEE BROADWAY SHOWS THIS FALL!

You Can’t Take It With You

STARRING: James Earl Jones, Rose Byrne, Annaleigh Ashford, Kristine Nielsen, Fran Kranz, Elizabeth Ashley, Johanna Day, Byron Jennings, and Reg Rogers
WHEN: Now through January 4, 2015
WHERE: Longacre Theatre / youcanttakeitwithyoubroadway.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: In her dazzling Broadway debut, Rose Byrne (Damages) continues to show off the comedic chops she displayed in Bridesmaids and Neighbors. With a cast that includes screen and stage legend James Earl Jones (Star WarsThe Great White HopeFences), the always hilarious Kristine Nielsen (Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike), and a scene-stealing Annaleigh Ashford (Kinky Boots), You Can’t Take It With You is a raucous comedy about an eccentric family that clashes with the conservative and rigid parents of the daughter’s fiancée when they come to dinner on the wrong night. This revival includes everything from snakes to fireworks to Russian royalty to prison sentences to ballet dancers – what more could you ask for?
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You Can’t Take It With You

This Is Our Youth

STARRING: Michael Cera, Kieran Culkin, Tavi Gevinson
WHEN: Now through January 4, 2015
WHERE: Cort Theatre / thisisouryouthbroadway.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: Set in New York in 1982, this Kenneth Lonergan-written play chronicles 48 hours in the lives of three materialistic teenagers. Michael Cera (Arrested DevelopmentSuperbad) makes his Great White Way debut as Warren, a dejected 19-year-old who has just stolen $15,000 from his father, while Kieran Culkin (Igby Goes Down) plays his drug-dealing friend whose apartment acts as the show’s setting. Rookie Magazine founder and Editor-in-chief Tavi Gevinson rounds out the cast as Jessica, a fashion student that Warren tries to impress with his newfound cash. Tackling issues of adolescence against the backdrop of the Raegan era, This Is Our Youth has all the makings of a contemporary classic.
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This Is Our Youth

Hedwig & The Angry Inch

STARRING: Andrew Rannells (through October 12), Michael C. Hall (starting October 16), Lena Hall
WHEN: Now
WHERE: Belasco Theatre / hedwigbroadway.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: Winner of this year’s Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical, the premiere Broadway production of this rock musical tells the story of a fictional rock and roll band fronted by a transgender woman from East Berlin. Hedwig tells her story in an extended monologue, recalling a romance that never came to fruition after a botched sex change operation tore the couple apart. A thought-provoking musical with a genius score, Hedwig stars Andrew Rannells (GirlsThe Book of Mormon) through October 12, at which point Michael C. Hall (Six Feet UnderDexter) will don the illustrious wig of the title role.
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Hedwig & The Angry Inch

Cabaret

STARRING: Alan Cumming, Michelle Williams (through November 9), Emma Stone (from November 11-February 1, 2015), Danny Burstein, Linda Emond
WHEN: Now through March 29, 2015
WHERE: Studio 54 / cabaretmusical.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: This fall, Alan Cumming will be on your TV screen as the neurotic and brilliantly manipulative Eli Gold on CBS’ The Good Wife and at your local bookstore with the release of his gripping new memoir, Not My Father’s Son. But you’re not truly a fan of Cumming’s until you’ve seen his career-best performance as the Master of Ceremonies in Cabaret. Reprising his Tony Award-winning role from the 1998 production, Cumming is joined in the Kit Kat Klub by Academy Award nominee Michelle Williams (Blue Valentine; Brokeback Mountain) as the self-destructive Sally Bowles. And when Williams trades in her pink boa, it’ll be picked up by Emma Stone (The HelpEasy A) – who was originally rumored to play Bowles when this revival was first announced. With an unforgettable score by Kander and Ebb, Cabaret shines a spotlight on 1930’s Berlin when sex was rampant and the darkest period in Germany’s history was just around the corner.
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Cabaret

A Delicate Balance

STARRING: Glenn Close, John Lithgow, Martha Plimpton, Lindsay Duncan, Bob Balaban, Clare Higgins
WHEN: October 20 – February 22, 2015
WHERE: John Golden Theatre / adelicatebalancebroadway.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: Three-time Tony Award-winner Glenn Close (DamagesSunset Boulevard) makes her overdue return to the Broadway stage in this revival of Edward Albee’s exploration of a long-married couple during the course of a weekend when their daughter returns home after the dissolution of her fourth marriage. Meanwhile, their home also acts as a refuge for some of their friends and an alcoholic sister. And you thought your family reunions were dramatic.
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A Delicate Balance

It’s Only A Play

STARRING: Matthew Broderick, Nathan Lane, Stockard Channing, Megan Mullally, Rupert Grint, F. Murray Abraham, Micah Stock 
WHEN: 
Now through January 4, 2015
WHERE: 
Schoenfeld Theatre / itsonlyaplay.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: 
Terrence McNally’s biting, hilarious satire on the world of theater makes its Broadway debut with an all-star cast. As a panicked playwright nervously awaits the reviews of the opening night of his new show, he shares his anxieties with the production’s drug-addled lead actress, a television star, a snide critic, a first-time producer, a young director, and the coat check guy. What ensues is a chaotic, and uproarious look at what it takes to put up a Broadway production.
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It’s Only A Play

The Elephant Man

STARRING: Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson, Alessandro Nivola, Anthony Heald, Scott Lowell, Kathryn Meisle, Henry Stram
WHEN: 
November 7 – February 15, 2015
WHERE: 
Booth Theatre / elephantmanbroadway.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: 
Set in 19th century England, The Elephant Man is based on the true story of Joseph Merrick, star of a traveling freak show. As Merrick’s popularity rises, he attracts the attention of a beautiful actress who’s fascinated by his story and profound intelligence. Cooper and Clarkson have both proven to be some of the most versatile screen actors around, so it’ll be exciting to see how that translates to the stage. Sorry Ryan Murphy, but this is the freak show we’re most excited about.
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The Elephant Man

Side Show

STARRING: Erin Davie, Emily Padgett, Ryan Silverman, David St. Louis, Matthew Hydzik
WHEN: October 28 – TBD
WHERE: St. James Theatre / sideshowbroadway.com
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: Academy Award-winning director Bill Condon (ChicagoDreamgirls) makes his Broadway debut with this retooled musical revival based on the incredible true story of twins Daisy and Violet Hilton. Set in the 1920s and 30s, Side Show follows the sisters’ journey as they go from being vaudeville acts to glamorous Hollywood stars, all while looking for love and a sense of normalcy under the spotlight. The original 1997 production launched the careers of Alice Ripley and Emily Skinner, and based on what we’ve seen so far, Davie and Padgett seem to be on the same path.
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Side Show

Les Misérables

STARRING: Ramin Karimloo, Will Swenson, Caissie Levy, Nikki M. James, Andy Mientus
WHEN: Now – TBD
WHERE: Imperial Theatre / lesmis.com/broadway
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: Ramin Karimloo. Plain and simple, Karimloo is the most talented actor to ever take on the role of Jean Valjean. Making his Broadway debut after a successful career on the West End, Karimloo has a jaw dropping voice that makes this musical soar to breathtaking new heights (and it doesn’t hurt that he’s not upsetting to look at either). With this revival, Broadway has found a leading man who has the ability to not only make an old musical feel new and exciting again, but someone who will undoubtedly become one of the most revered stage actors of our time.
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Les Misérables

The Real Thing

STARRING: Ewan McGregor, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Cynthia Nixon
WHEN: 
Now through Jan 4, 2015
WHERE: 
American Airlines Theatre / roundabouttheatre.org
WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT: 
This revival of Tom Stoppard’s acclaimed play-within-a-play explores what happens when life starts imitating art. A playwright who’s unhappily married to the lead in his current play about a marriage that’s falling apart starts to have an affair with their mutual friend. But as their relationship progresses, he starts to wonder where the boundaries between truth and fiction lie. A complex look into married life, this production promises to pack a punch as powerful as the performances within.
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The Real Thing

Originally published on PopBytes